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Excerpt from The Salem World of Nathaniel Hawthorne by Margaret Moore (courtesy of University of Missouri Press).

Excerpt from The Salem World of Nathaniel Hawthorne by Margaret Moore (courtesy of University of Missouri Press).

Margaret Moore vividly conveys the "bad blood" that existed between Quakers and Puritans and the kinds of cruel punishments Puritans visited upon Quakers who refused to comply with Puritan practices.

"Another dispute in Salem concerned the Quakers. The early Quakers did not conduct themselves in a way to guarantee peace. John Higginson (1616-1708), Salem's minister, had put into the covenant of the church that 'The Quaker light was a stinking vapour from hell.' The Quakers were people who believed . . . that 'one did not need the preachings of a learned, salaried ministry to cultivate the Light and be saved.' But in cultivating the Light, they used methods that horrified the Puritans. The Salem Quaker group was never large. It met in the woods on the west of town in the home of Nicholas and Hannah Phelps and entertained visiting missionaries. The Quakers were repeatedly fined for not attending the established church, and some were banished. Four visitors were hanged in Boston. When Charles II ascended the English throne, the order was given not to kill any more Quakers. Yet the sect continued to outrage many colonists, and beatings were decreed. The guilty were tied to a cart, stripped to the waist and whipped through town; even women were punished in this way by William Hathorne and others. Another Quaker, Thomas Maule of Salem, was whipped in May 1669 for saying, 'Mr. Higginson preached lies' and 'his instruction was the doctrine of devils'" (13-14).




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