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Images Relating to Witchcraft and "Alice Doane's Appeal"

Images Relating to Witchcraft and "Alice Doane's Appeal"

Images of or relating to Proctor's Ledge and Gallows Hill in Salem
Images of witches hanged in England
Portraits and paintings
Gravestones and Memorial Markers related to Salem Witchcraft
Gravestones and Memorial Markers related to Indian-English Conflict
Title Pages and Illustrations
The Nurse Family Homestead
Maps related to Salem Witchcraft
Other Images related to Salem Village and Accused Witches

Images of or relating to Proctor's Ledge and Gallows Hill in Salem

View of Proctor's Ledge, Salem
View of Proctor's Ledge, Salem
The confirmed location of the Salem witchcraft executions of 1692 (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Proctor's Ledge, Salem, from Near Boston St.
Proctor's Ledge, Salem, from Near Boston St.
Site of now-confirmed location of the execution of accused witches (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Proctor's Ledge, Salem, Seen from Proctor St.
Proctor's Ledge, Salem, Seen from Proctor St.
Site of the now-confirmed execution of accused witches (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
The Victims of the Witchcraft Hysteria of 1692
The Victims of the Witchcraft Hysteria of 1692
Gallows Hill, on the outskirts of Salem Town, was the place traditionally thought to be the place of execution during the Salem Witch Hysteria of 1692. Nearby Proctor's Ledge, however, is now confirmed as the actual location.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
View of Gallows Hill, Salem, Massachusetts.
View of Gallows Hill, Salem, Massachusetts.
In his history of the Salem witchcraft hysteria Charles W. Upham made note that the place of execution of the condemned witches was "a point where the spectacle would be witnessed by the whole surrounding country far and near, being on the brow of the highest eminence in the vicinity of the town." According to many sources the executions took place on the southern edge of the hill, seen toward the center in this recent photograph. The specific location, however, has been conformed as Proctor's Ledge, between Proctor and Pope Street, near Gallows Hill Park, but closer to Boston Street and the North River. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Gallows Hill, Salem, Massachusetts.
Gallows Hill, Salem, Massachusetts.
A View of the Summit of Gallows Hill, Salem (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Summit of Gallows Hill, Salem, Massachusetts
Summit of Gallows Hill, Salem, Massachusetts
Summit of Gallows Hill (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Tree Near Gallows Hill, Salem, Massachusetts.
Tree Near Gallows Hill, Salem, Massachusetts.
Tree Near Gallows Hill (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Near Gallows Hill
Near Gallows Hill
Salem, Massachusetts. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Near Gallows Hill
Near Gallows Hill
Salem, Massachusetts (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
View of Gallows Hill, Salem, Massachusetts, circa 1890.  From the Robb Collection.
View of Gallows Hill, Salem, Massachusetts, circa 1890. From the Robb Collection.
Gallows Hill, Salem. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
View of Gallows Hill Area, Salem.
Robb Photo.
View of Gallows Hill Area, Salem. Robb Photo.
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
View of Gallows Hill Area, Salem.
Robb Photo.
View of Gallows Hill Area, Salem. Robb Photo.
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Gallows Hill, Salem, circa 1898.
Photograph from N. W. Elwell, Boston
Gallows Hill, Salem, circa 1898. Photograph from N. W. Elwell, Boston
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Illustration of Lower Gallows Hill Area by George M. White, c. 1888.
Illustration of Lower Gallows Hill Area by George M. White, c. 1888.
Nineteenth Century Illustration of Gallows Hill Area: Where the Salem "Witches" Were Hanged. Proctor's Ledge, however, was the actual place of the executions. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Perley's Sketch of the Crevice and Place of the Locust Trees, Proctor's Ledge, Salem
Perley's Sketch of the Crevice and Place of the Locust Trees, Proctor's Ledge, Salem
It was Salem historian Sidney Perley who first suggested the site of Proctor's Ledge as the most likely location of the hangings of 1692. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Woodwax or Dyer's Greenweed (Genista tinctoria) (mentioned in \"Alice Doane's Appeal\")
Woodwax or Dyer's Greenweed (Genista tinctoria) (mentioned in "Alice Doane's Appeal")
Also known as Dyer's Weed, Woad Waxen, and Dyer's Broom (Genista tinctoria).  (courtesy of http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/b/brodye72.html)
Woodwax or Dyer's Greenweed (Genista tinctoria) (mentioned in \"Alice Doane's Appeal\"
Photo copyright Henriette Kress
Woodwax or Dyer's Greenweed (Genista tinctoria) (mentioned in "Alice Doane's Appeal" Photo copyright Henriette Kress
Gov. John Endicott brought Woodwax (or Dyer’s Greenweed) to New England in 1628. The English colonists wanted the yellow-flowering plant to dye wool and flax. It soon became an invasive, alien weed, covering the meadows and hills of the Salem area. It can be found today growing in Salem Woods. (courtesy Henriette's Herbal Home Page, Henriette Kress,http://www.ibiblio.org/herbmed )

Images of witches hanged in England

Execution of Witches in England
Execution of Witches in England
Illustration from England's Grievance Discovered by Ralph Gardiner. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
The Hanging of a Witch
The Hanging of a Witch
In 1692 nineteen people--fourteen women and five men--were hanged as witches or wizards on Gallows Hill in Salem, Massachusetts.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

Portraits and paintings

Reverend Samuel Parris
Reverend Samuel Parris
Undated miniature portrait of Reverend Samuel Parris from the collection of the Massachusetts Historical Society. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Portrait of Cotton Mather (1663-1723)
Portrait of Cotton Mather (1663-1723)
Cotton Mather was one of Puritan New England's most influential ministers and leaders. He was famous for his writings, histories such as Magnalia Christi Americana and those that helped stir up support for the Salem Witchcraft Trials of 1692. He also promoted learning and early scientific knowledge in New England. He worked for acceptance of the smallpox vaccine and wrote a treatise on medicine called The Angel of Bethesda.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Portrait of Samuel Sewall (1652-1730) by John Smibert (1688-1751)
Portrait of Samuel Sewall (1652-1730) by John Smibert (1688-1751)
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Portrait of Charles W. Upham (1802 - 1876)
Portrait of Charles W. Upham (1802 - 1876)
Charles W. Upham was the author of Salem Witchcraft (1867), as well as a series of earlier lectures on the Salem Witchcraft hysteria. Nathaniel Hawthorne was displeased with Upham's harsh portrayal of John Hathorne's role in the 1692 persecutions.  

Gravestones and Memorial Markers related to Salem Witchcraft

Mary Corry, Wife of Giles Corry, 1684
Mary Corry, Wife of Giles Corry, 1684
The Simple gravestone of Mary Corry, first wife of Giles Corry (Corey), who was pressed to death in September 19, 1692. Corey's second wife, Martha, was hanged as a witch on Gallows Hill September 22.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Gravestone Memorial to George Jacobs, Sr.
Gravestone Memorial to George Jacobs, Sr.
This slate gravemarker for Witchcraft victim George Jacobs, Sr. is a reproduction of a typical 17th century New England gravestone. It was placed in his memory in the Nurse Family Burial Ground in Danvers during the . . .  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Gravestone of Elizabeth Parris, 1696, Wadsworth Cemetery, Danvers, Massachusetts.
Gravestone of Elizabeth Parris, 1696, Wadsworth Cemetery, Danvers, Massachusetts.
Slate gravestone of Elizabeth Parris, wife of Rev. Samuel Parris of Salem Village. It was in her house, the old parsonage, that Tituba the Barbados slave told stories of the occult to impressionable girls and set off the hysteria that swept the towns north of Boston. The epitaph, initialed “S.P.” reads: “Sleep precious Dust no Stranger now to Rest. / Thou hast thy longed wish in Abrahams Brest. / Farewell best Wife, choice Mother, Neighbor, Friend. / Weel wail the less for hopes of Thee i th End.”  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Rebecca Nurse Monument, Nurse Family Cemetery, Pine Street, Danvers, Massachusetts.  (Frank Cousins Photo, 1891)
Rebecca Nurse Monument, Nurse Family Cemetery, Pine Street, Danvers, Massachusetts. (Frank Cousins Photo, 1891)
This monument was erected in 1885 in Danvers (Salem Village) to honor the memory of Rebecca Nurse, one of the accused witches executed in Salem in 1692. According to family tradition, Rebecca's body was retrieved from Gallows Hill by her son, Samuel, and buried in an unmarked grave at the family homestead. This was done in defiance of the law, which stated that an executed "witch" could not receive a Christian burial. The monument is inscribed with a poetic epitaph written by John Greenleaf Whittier. It reads: "O, Christian martyr! who for truth could die,/ When all about thee owned the hideous lie! / The world, redeemed from superstition's sway, / Is breathing freer for thy sake today."  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
John Hathorne Gravestone, 1717
John Hathorne Gravestone, 1717
John Hathorne, 1717 Charter Street Burial Ground, Salem (Stone carved by John Holliman) (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Rev.John Hale Gravestone, 1700, Beverly, Massachusetts.
Rev.John Hale Gravestone, 1700, Beverly, Massachusetts.
In 1664 John Hale became minister of the church at "Bass River," which became the town of Beverly in 1667. He held this position for over thirty years. He supported the Salem witch hunt of 1692 until his second wife, Sarah (Noyes), was accused of witchcraft, at which time he changed his opinion. He is buried next to his wives in the Hale Family plot, not far from his house in Beverly, Massachusetts.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Rev. Joseph Green Gravestone, Danvers (Carved by John Holiman)
Rev. Joseph Green Gravestone, Danvers (Carved by John Holiman)
Rev. Joseph Green came to Salem Village in 1697 to become its minister after Rev. Samuel Parris left. Rev. Green led the shaken community out of the shadow of the witchcraft delusion into the light of the 18th century.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
The Burying Point, 1637, Salem
The Burying Point, 1637, Salem
The Burying Point, Salem's oldest cemetery, dates from 1637 and contains the remains and gravemarkers of many prominent people in Salem's history. Some of Hawthorne's early ancestors are buried here, as well as individuals associated with the witchcraft episode and China trade period. The burial ground is situated on what was once a bluff, projecting into the South River. Cattle used to graze in the burial ground, and for several years it was the site of John Horne's windmill.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Hathorne Family Gravestones in The Burying Point
Hathorne Family Gravestones in The Burying Point
Hathorne family gravestones in The Burying Point,established in 1637, and the oldest cemetery in Salem. It is located on Charter St. next to the Peabody (Grimshawe) house in Salem. None of the Hawthornes are buried in the Charter Street Burying Point. (photography by Bruce Hibbard)
Sign at Burying Point on Charter Street, next to the Peabody (Grimshawe) housein Salem
Sign at Burying Point on Charter Street, next to the Peabody (Grimshawe) housein Salem
Sign at The Burying Point, Charter Street, next to the Peabody (Grimshawe) house in Salem. (photography by Bruce Hibbard)
Charter Street Burying Point, established 1637; oldest cemetery in Salem
Charter Street Burying Point, established 1637; oldest cemetery in Salem
Charter Street Burying Point, Oldest cemetery in Salem, established in 1637. (photography by Bruce Hibbard)
Giles and Martha Corey Markers, Peabody, MA
Giles and Martha Corey Markers, Peabody, MA
Giles and Martha Corey markers near their homesite by Crystal Lake, now west Peabody, MA. Photograph courtesy of Traci A. Canavan

Gravestones and Memorial Markers related to Indian-English Conflict

Gravestone for King George's War Captive Samuel Allen, Deerfield, MA.
Gravestone for King George's War Captive Samuel Allen, Deerfield, MA.
In Memory of Samuel Allen who fell by the Indian Savages April ye 25th 1746 Valiantly Defending his Own Life and Children in ye 45th year of his age.  Photography and Transcription Courtesy of Tom and Brenda Malloy of The Association for Gravestone Studies.
Gravestone for Captain Edward Hutchinson of Marlborough, MA, Killed during King Philip's War.
Gravestone for Captain Edward Hutchinson of Marlborough, MA, Killed during King Philip's War.
Captain Edward Hutchinson Aged 62 years Was shot by the treacherous Indians Aug. 2, 1675 Died 19 August 1675. Erected by the Gen. Jos. Badger Chapter Of the Daughters of the American Revolution Oct. 27,1921. (He was the son of Anne Hutchinson, who was expelled from Massachusetts Bay Colony for sedition in 1638 and later died in an Indian attack in Long Island.)  Photography and Transcription Courtesy of Tom and Brenda Malloy of The Association for Gravestone Studies.
Gravestone of Capt. Thomas Lake, 1676, Copp's Hill Burial Ground, Boston.
Gravestone of Capt. Thomas Lake, 1676, Copp's Hill Burial Ground, Boston.
Capt. Thomas Lake, who was "perfidiously slain by ye Indians at Kennibeck, August ye 14, 1676."  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Gravestone for an Indian Captive, Deerfield, MA
Gravestone for an Indian Captive, Deerfield, MA
In memory of Judah Wright who died August 30th, 1747 in the 72nd Year of his age. He was one of the unfortunate who was captured by the Indians Feb. 29th 1703-04.  Photography and Transcription Courtesy of Tom and Brenda Malloy of The Association for Gravestone Studies.
Gravestone for an Indian Captive, Deerfield, MA
Gravestone for an Indian Captive, Deerfield, MA
Here lies the Body of Mrs. Eunice Williams the Virtuous and desirable consort of the Revd. John Williams and daughter to ye Revd. Mr. Eleazer and Mrs. Esther Mather of Northhampton. She was born Aug. 2, 1664 and fell by the Barberous Enemy March 1, 1703-04. (She was captured during the Deerfield raid and then killed when she couldn’t keep up with the other captives. The account was later published by her husband.)  Photography and Transcription Courtesy of Tom and Brenda Malloy of The Association for Gravestone Studies.
Gravestone for a Native American, Lakeville, MA.
Gravestone for a Native American, Lakeville, MA.
In Memory of Ben Simon the last Native American of Middleboro. He was a Revolutionary War Soldier and died in May 1831 aged 80 years.  Photography and Transcription Courtesy of Tom and Brenda Malloy of The Association for Gravestone Studies.

Title Pages and Illustrations

Title Page of Cotton Mather's  <I>The Wonders of the Invisible World </I>
Title Page of Cotton Mather's The Wonders of the Invisible World
Cotton Mather's defense of the Salem Witchcraft Trials portrayed those involved as caught in a battle between the forces of good and evil in the New World.  
Title Page of Rev. John Hale's \"A Modest Enquiry into the Nature of Witchcraft,\" 1697
Title Page of Rev. John Hale's "A Modest Enquiry into the Nature of Witchcraft," 1697
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Charles Upham's <I/>Salem Witchcraft<I>
Charles Upham's Salem Witchcraft
Title Page from Charles Upham's Salem Witchcraft (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
The Autographs of John Hathorne and Jonathan Corwin, from Charles W. Upham's<I> Salem Witchcraft</I>,vol. II, p. 29
The Autographs of John Hathorne and Jonathan Corwin, from Charles W. Upham's Salem Witchcraft,vol. II, p. 29
In 1692 John Hathorne and Jonathan Corwin served as the magistrates of Salem Town. They issued warrants for the arrest of those accused of witchcraft and were principal interrogators of the "witches" throughout the year.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Witches with their Familiar Flying on Broomsticks.
Witches with their Familiar Flying on Broomsticks.
In the British Islands, it was believed that the Devil gave his witches a faithful demonic creature, often in the shape of a small animal (a black cat, dog, or toad, for example) that would advise the witch and assist in her evil doings. Also known as "imps" or "familiar spirits," these malicious creatures were different from the Devil himself, who often took the shape of a beast or a human, in European and early American traditions of witchcraft. It was thought that the witch's familiar would suck her blood for nourishment.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
 Witch of the Woodlands
Witch of the Woodlands
Witches were thought to own or associate with stange animals and evil creatures called "familiars."  
A Witch Ducking
A Witch Ducking
Illustration from A Popular History of the United States by William Cullen Bryant. New York, Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1896. One 'foolproof' way to establish whether a suspect was a witch was ducking. With right thumb bound to left toe, the accused was plunged into a convenient pond. If he or she floated, it proved an association with the black arts, with the body rejecting the baptismal water. If the victim drowned, he or she was innocent. A ducking stool or diving chair was also used in America for witches.  (courtesy of The Boston Public Library.)
Old Postcard: A Witch Stealing Children
Old Postcard: A Witch Stealing Children
A witch stealing away children from a late-nineteenth century postcard in the Peabody Essex Collections (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Engraving of the George Jacobs House
Engraving of the George Jacobs House
From Charles W. Upham's Salem Witchcraft, 1867.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

The Nurse Family Homestead

Rebecca Nurse Farm
Danvers, Massachusetts
Rebecca Nurse Farm Danvers, Massachusetts
The Francis and Rebecca Nurse Farm was originally three hundred acres and close to the center of Salem Village. Francis Nurse was a member of the Village group that opposed Rev. Samuel Parris.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Rebecca Nurse House, ca 1678.
Danvers, Massachusetts
Rebecca Nurse House, ca 1678. Danvers, Massachusetts
The Rebecca Nurse House and Farm, 149 Pine Street, Danvers, Massachusetts. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Rebecca Nurse Family Cemetery and House, 1678, Danvers, Mass.
Rebecca Nurse Family Cemetery and House, 1678, Danvers, Mass.
On a March day in 1692 friends came to the Nurse house to tell Rebecca she had been accused of witchcraft. Seventy-one year old, bedridden with illness, Nurse dumbfoundly responsed, "As to this thing I am Innocent as the child unborne." Even a reprieve from Governor Phips and a petiton from influential neighbors could not save her from execution on Gallows Hill, July 19. Her body was retrieved by family members and secretly returned to this farm and buried in an unmarked grave.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Rebecca Nurse Family Cemetery and House, 1678, Danvers, Mass.
Rebecca Nurse Family Cemetery and House, 1678, Danvers, Mass.
On March 23, 1692, Edward and Jonathan Putnam went to officials to swear out a complaint against Rebecca Nurse. A warrant for her arrest was issued immediately, and next day her examination was held in the Salem Village meeting house. When asked by John Hathorne for her response to the charges against her, Rebecca said, " I can say before my Eternal father I am innocent, & God will clear my innocency."  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Nurse Homestead, ca 1678, 149 Pine Street Danvers, Massachusetts.
Nurse Homestead, ca 1678, 149 Pine Street Danvers, Massachusetts.
Originally owned in 1636 by Townsend Bishop, this land was occupied by Francis Nurse, whose wife, Rebecca, was accused of witchcraft in April of 1692 and was executed the following July. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Rear View of the Nurse Family Homestead, ca 1678, Danvers, Massachusetts (Formerly Salem Village).
Rear View of the Nurse Family Homestead, ca 1678, Danvers, Massachusetts (Formerly Salem Village).
The homestead is a superb example of a Colonial New England farmstead. Close by is the family burial ground including the grave of witchcraft victim George Jacobs, as well as the monument to Rebecca Nurse, inscribed with an epitaph written by poet John Greenleaf Whittier. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Sunset View, the Nurse Homestead, ca 1678, Danvers, Massachusetts (Formerly Salem Village).
Sunset View, the Nurse Homestead, ca 1678, Danvers, Massachusetts (Formerly Salem Village).
Rebecca Nurse was accused of witchcraft in April of 1692 and executed at Gallows Hill, Salem, the following July. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Fireplace in kitchen of Rebecca Nurse House in Danvers
Fireplace in kitchen of Rebecca Nurse House in Danvers
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Interior of Rebecca Nurse House in Danvers
Interior of Rebecca Nurse House in Danvers
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Interior of Rebecca Nurse House in Danvers
Interior of Rebecca Nurse House in Danvers
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Kitchen of Rebecca Nurse House in Danvers
Kitchen of Rebecca Nurse House in Danvers
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Bedroom of Rebecca Nurse House in Danvers
Bedroom of Rebecca Nurse House in Danvers
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Spinning Wheel, Rebecca Nurse House in Danvers
Spinning Wheel, Rebecca Nurse House in Danvers
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Upstairs in Rebecca Nurse House in Danvers
Upstairs in Rebecca Nurse House in Danvers
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Bedroom fireplace, upstairs in Rebecca Nurse House in Danvers
Bedroom fireplace, upstairs in Rebecca Nurse House in Danvers
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Cradle and fireplace in upstairs bedroom of Rebecca Nurse House in Danvers
Cradle and fireplace in upstairs bedroom of Rebecca Nurse House in Danvers
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

Maps related to Salem Witchcraft

Perley's Map of Gallows Hill and Area
Perley's Map of Gallows Hill and Area
Perley's Map of Gallows Hill and Area (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Giles Corey Farm Area--Part of West Peabody, MA in 1700
Giles Corey Farm Area--Part of West Peabody, MA in 1700
Giles Corey Farm Area--Part of West Peabody, MA in 1700 

Other Images Related to Salem Village and Accused Witches

Nathaniel Ingersoll's Ordinary, Danvers, Mass.
Nathaniel Ingersoll's Ordinary, Danvers, Mass.
One of the most important landmarks in the Salem Witchcraft Hysteria of 1692 was Deacon Ingersoll's ordinary, a place of lodging and refreshment. Built around 1670, the ordinary was used by visitors to Salem Village and by the magistrates and marshals of Essex County during the examinations. John Indian, Tituba's husband, worked here, and most of the accused "witches" and afflicted girls were brought to the ordinary during 1692. The earliest portion of house dates to the 17th century.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Replica of the Salem Village Meeting House, used in the film \"Three Sovereigns for Sarah\" (1985)
Replica of the Salem Village Meeting House, used in the film "Three Sovereigns for Sarah" (1985)
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Sketch of the Original Salem Village Meeting House
Sketch of the Original Salem Village Meeting House
The Meeting House at Salem Village originally stood at what is now the intersections of Forest and Hobart Streets in Danvers, Mass. In 1701 the first meeting house was abandoned and a new building constructed on the site of the current First Church at the corner of Hobart and Centre Streets. (courtesy of Danvers Archival Center)
George Jacobs' House
Danversport, Mass.  Frank Cousins Photo, 1891
George Jacobs' House Danversport, Mass. Frank Cousins Photo, 1891
George Jacobs' house was erected in 1690.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
George Jacobs' House and Barns
Danversport, Mass.  Frank Cousins Photo, 1891
George Jacobs' House and Barns Danversport, Mass. Frank Cousins Photo, 1891
George Jacobs' house was erected in 1690.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Engraving of the George Jacobs House
Engraving of the George Jacobs House
From Charles W. Upham's Salem Witchcraft, 1867.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Canes of George Jacobs, a witchcraft victim.
Canes of George Jacobs, a witchcraft victim.
Canes used by George Jacobs, witchcraft victim.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Where the Witchcraft Hysteria Began
Where the Witchcraft Hysteria Began
Site of the Salem Village Parsonage, 1692. (Frank Cousins Photo, 1891)  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Site of the Salem Village Meeting House, 1692
Site of the Salem Village Meeting House, 1692
Site of the First Church, Danvers (Salem Village) Corner of Forrest and Hobart Streets (Frank Cousins Photo, c. 1891) (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Ann Putnam House, Off Dayton Street, Danvers, MA.
Circa 1891, Frank Cousins Collection
Ann Putnam House, Off Dayton Street, Danvers, MA. Circa 1891, Frank Cousins Collection
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
\"Home of the Rev. Samuel Parris, Centre Street, Danvers.\" (Circa 1891) Frank Cousins Collection.
"Home of the Rev. Samuel Parris, Centre Street, Danvers." (Circa 1891) Frank Cousins Collection.
This photo shows the ell, which was built as an addition to the original Salem Village parsonage by Rev. Peter Clark in 1734. The old parsonage, home to Samuel and Elizabeth Parris during the witchcraft episode was torn down ca. 1784. The ell was then moved to Sylvan Street, Danvers.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Holten House, ca. 1670, Danvers, Massachusetts
Holten House, ca. 1670, Danvers, Massachusetts
Sarah and Benjamin Holten House, ca. 1670, Corner of Holten and Centre Streets, Danvers. (Photo, ca.1891).  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Mary Hollingsworth Sampler, Circa 1665 -1670.
Mary Hollingsworth Sampler, Circa 1665 -1670.
Mary Hollingsworth came from a wealthy merchant family. In 1673, she married Philip English, one of Salem's most influential and successful shipowners. In 1692 both Mary and Philip were accused of witchcraft. He and his wife escaped,however,only to be found and held in custody until they escaped again and found refuge in New York. They later returned to Salem when the witchcraft hysteria ended. 
Brass Sundial, Dated 1644, and Owned by John Proctor.
Brass Sundial, Dated 1644, and Owned by John Proctor.
John Proctor lived with his wife Elizabeth in what is now Peabody, Massachusetts. They were respected farmers and keepers of a tavern. Mary Warren, one of the "afflicted girls" of Salem Village was a servant in the Proctor household. Early in 1692, Proctor had been an outspoken critic of the witchcraft proceedings and of the antics of the Village girls. He and his wife were accused of witchcraft and sent to prison. Both were convicted of witchcraft, and John was hanged on August 19. Elizabeth, who was found to be pregnant, was spared execution and outlived the 1692 hysteria. The story of the Proctors was later made famous by Arthur Miller in his play "The Crucible."  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Site of the Salem Village Parsonage 1681, Rear 67 Centre Street, Danvers, MA (Formerly Salem Village).
Site of the Salem Village Parsonage 1681, Rear 67 Centre Street, Danvers, MA (Formerly Salem Village).
The house was torn down in 1784 and excavated beginning in 1970. Today the park includes the original foundation walls and interpretive signs. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Site of the Salem Village Parsonage 1681, Rear 67 Centre Street, Danvers, MA (Formerly Salem Village).
Site of the Salem Village Parsonage 1681, Rear 67 Centre Street, Danvers, MA (Formerly Salem Village).
Accessible by a cart path, this archaeological site is the famous parsonage of Salem Village, the focal point of the witchcraft delusion of 1692. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)



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