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Images Related to "The Seven Vagabonds"

Penobscot Indian Arts
Photographs and Illustrations
Title Pages
Hawthorne and Raymond, Maine
Henry David Thoreau

Penobscot Indian Arts

Penobscot Indian Basket
Penobscot Indian Basket
Twisted Splint Ash Porcupine Basket. Penobscot Indian, 1946/48. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
A Chief's Collar(Red wool, glass beads)
Mid-Nineteenth Century Penobscot Indian.
A Chief's Collar(Red wool, glass beads) Mid-Nineteenth Century Penobscot Indian.
Chief's Collar, Mid-Nineteenth Century Penobscot Indian (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Penobscot Indian Knife
Penobscot Indian Knife
A Carved Crook Knife. Mid-Nineteenth Century Penobscot Indian. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Penobscot Indian Powder Horn
Late-Eighteenth, Early-Nineteenth Century
Penobscot Indian Powder Horn Late-Eighteenth, Early-Nineteenth Century
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Penobscot Indian Engraved Box;
Eighteenth Century
Penobscot Indian Engraved Box; Eighteenth Century
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Penobscot Birch-bark Vessel with Etched Designs
Penobscot Birch-bark Vessel with Etched Designs
Birch-bark Vessel  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Penobscot Indian Brown Ash Baskets
Penobscot Indian Brown Ash Baskets
Penobscot Indian Brown Ash baskets made by Master Basket Maker Barbara D. Francis of Indian Island, Old Town, Maine.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Penobscot Curly Bowl Basket, 
20” round x 5.50” high
Brown Ash and Sweet Grass
Penobscot Curly Bowl Basket, 20” round x 5.50” high Brown Ash and Sweet Grass
Penobscot Indian Curly Bowl Basket made by Barbara D. Francis of Indian Island, Old Town, Maine.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Penobscot Brown Ash Egg Basket,
Barbara D. Francis
Penobscot Brown Ash Egg Basket, Barbara D. Francis
Penobscot Indian Egg Basket by Barbara D. Francis, Indian Island, Old Town, Maine. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Penobscot Rosie Work Basket by Barbara D. Francis.
Penobscot Rosie Work Basket by Barbara D. Francis.
Penobscot Indian Rosie Work Basket by Barbara D. Francis, Indian Island, Old Town, Maine. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Penobscot Two-Tone Porcupine Weave Basket,
Barbara D. Francis
Penobscot Two-Tone Porcupine Weave Basket, Barbara D. Francis
Penobscot Indian Two-Tone Porcupine Weave Basket by Barbara D. Francis, Indian Island, Old Town, Maine. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Old Style Penobscot Indian Birch Bark Canoe.  Made by Henri Vaillancourt, Greenville, NH.
Old Style Penobscot Indian Birch Bark Canoe. Made by Henri Vaillancourt, Greenville, NH.
This eighteen foot reproduction of a Penobscot Indian birch bark canoe is in the style of those canoes used by Thoreau and his Indian guides on the lakes and rivers of the Maine woods. (courtesy of Henri Vaillancourt.)
Old Style Penobscot Indian Birch Bark Canoe.  Eighteen Feet Long. Made by Henri Vaillancourt, Greenville, NH.
Old Style Penobscot Indian Birch Bark Canoe. Eighteen Feet Long. Made by Henri Vaillancourt, Greenville, NH.
This photo shows the beautiful detail and exceptional craftsmanship of this reproduction Penobscot Indian birch bark canoe.  (courtesy of Henri Vaillancourt.)

Photographs and Illustrations

Chief Big Thunder (Frank Loring)
Chief Big Thunder (Frank Loring)
Chief Big Thunder (Frank Loring)  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Clara Paul Wearing Traditional Penobscot Clothing, circa 1840
Clara Paul Wearing Traditional Penobscot Clothing, circa 1840
Clara Paul, Penobscot Indian  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Unidentified Men Paddling a Penobscot Birch-bark Canoe
Unidentified Men Paddling a Penobscot Birch-bark Canoe
Paddling a Penobscot Birch-bark Canoe (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Illustration by Frank T. Merrill of Shem Drowne’s Indian warrior weathervane that stood on top of the Province House in Boston
Illustration by Frank T. Merrill of Shem Drowne’s Indian warrior weathervane that stood on top of the Province House in Boston
Shem Drowne was a renowned weather vane-maker of the mid 1700s. The illustration was for "Howe's Masquerade" in In Colonial Days published by L.C. Page & Co. in 1906 (2) (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

Title Pages

<I/>Twice-Told Tales</I>,
Twice-Told Tales,
The Cover of Hawthorne's Twice-Told Tales, "Salem Edition," published in 1893 by Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
<I/>Twice-Told Tales</I>, the \"Salem Edition,\" 1893, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge.
Twice-Told Tales, the "Salem Edition," 1893, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge.
Title Page of Hawthorne's Twice-Told Tales, the "Salem Edition," 1893. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)

Hawthorne and Raymond, Maine


View of "Frye's Leap" on Raymond Cape after paintings on the rock have faded. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Close-up of painting on rocks in Raymond, Maine
Close-up of painting on rocks in Raymond, Maine
The paintings, which some said were made by Indians, have faded over time. (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
Rock on Raymond Cape between the Cape and Frye Island
Rock on Raymond Cape between the Cape and Frye Island
Named "Frye's Leap" because a Captain Frye, leaped from the rock to the island fleeing from pursuing Indians. Later, according to E.H. Knight in Raymond Then and Now, "during the steamboat era as an attraction to passengers, supposed Indian paintings on the rock were reinforced in bright colors. To further intrigue the passengers a man or boy was hired for the summer to live in a tent on the top to appear in full regalia and with blood-curdling whoops fire a gun in the air" (6).  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Detail of faded paintings at \"Frye's Leap\"
Detail of faded paintings at "Frye's Leap"
View of rock at "Frye's Leap" on Raymond Cape where paintings, said to be by Indians, have faded over time.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Hawthorne House in Raymond, Maine
Hawthorne House in Raymond, Maine
The Hawthorne House in South Casco, Maine, built by Richard Manning for his sister, Nathaniel Hawthorne's mother. This photograph shows the house in a state of disrepair, before it was restored by the Hawthorne Association. (courtesy of Raymond Woman's Club,Cardinal Publishing.)
Restored Hawthorne House at South Casco, built by Richard Manning for his sister, Nathaniel Hawthorne's mother
Restored Hawthorne House at South Casco, built by Richard Manning for his sister, Nathaniel Hawthorne's mother
Before being taken over and restored by the Hawthorne Association, the house was the Radoux Meeting House. Francis Radoux, who married Richard Manning's widow, made the house a community meeting place to satisfy a provision in Manning's will which left money for this purpose. (courtesy of Raymond Woman's Club,Cardinal Publishing.)
View of the Hawthorne House across the Dingley Brook from South Casco, Maine
View of the Hawthorne House across the Dingley Brook from South Casco, Maine
The photo was probably taken shortly after the house, which had been used by Raymond Village as the Radoux Meeting House, underwent restoration by the Hawthorne Association. Here the house is freshly painted. (courtesy of Raymond Woman's Club,Cardinal Publishing.)
Mill and box factory run by Willard Libby and built on the site of the original Dingley Sawmill
Mill and box factory run by Willard Libby and built on the site of the original Dingley Sawmill
The Dingley Sawmill and other mills were across the road from the house where Nathaniel Hawthorne spent time in Raymond, Maine.  (courtesy of Raymond Woman's Club,Cardinal Publishing.)
View of the Manning House, now in South Casco, built about 1810 in what was then Raymondtown, MA, but which became Casco, Maine, when Maine separated from Massachusetts in 1820 and Casco separated from Raymond town in 1841.
View of the Manning House, now in South Casco, built about 1810 in what was then Raymondtown, MA, but which became Casco, Maine, when Maine separated from Massachusetts in 1820 and Casco separated from Raymond town in 1841.
Richard Manning was local agent from the Raymond town Proprietors and was also the town blacksmith. According to Knight, in Manning's work as local agent and "through the acquisition of lands of proprietors in arrears on their assessments [Manning] owned a high percentage of the land of the town" (20). Knight notes that "the division line between Raymond and Casco is the Dingley Brook to the left of the house" (20). (courtesy of Raymond Woman's Club,Cardinal Publishing.)
Early picture of the Baptist Church on Raymond Hill, one of the first two churches in Raymondtown
Early picture of the Baptist Church on Raymond Hill, one of the first two churches in Raymondtown
The addition to the building in the rear was, according to Knight, "supposed to have been the building of the first church, which is very likely so, as it is of older origin and would not have been an added structure in this location and form" (173). Knight also notes that "the land for the Hill church was deeded by Richard Manning, agent for the Proprietors, on 23 March, 1803," and he points out that "the cemetery contains the graves of early settlers of Raymond"(173). (courtesy of Raymond Woman's Club,Cardinal Publishing.)

Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau
Henry David Thoreau
Daguerreotype taken of Henry David Thoreau at age 39 in 1856.  (courtesy of The Thoreau Society)
Joseph Aitteon, c. 1862
Joseph Aitteon, c. 1862
Aitteon was a Penobscot guide for Thoreau in Maine in 1853. 
 Walden Pond Reservation, Concord, MA.
Walden Pond Reservation, Concord, MA.
Replica of Thoreau's Cabin, Walden Pond  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Walden Pond Seen from the Thoreau Cabinsite.
Walden Pond Seen from the Thoreau Cabinsite.
View of Walden Pond, Concord, MA (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
The Shore of Walden Pond Near the Thoreau Cabinsite.
The Shore of Walden Pond Near the Thoreau Cabinsite.
View of Walden Pond, Concord, MA (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Thoreau's Cabin Site, Walden Pond, Concord, MA
Thoreau's Cabin Site, Walden Pond, Concord, MA
Thoreau's Cabin Site, Walden Pond, Concord, MA  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Walden Pond, Concord, MA
Walden Pond, Concord, MA
from A Journey Into the Transcendentalists' New England by Robert Todd Felton (courtesy of Robert Todd Felton)
Walden Pond in 2006
Walden Pond in 2006
from A Journey Into the Transcendentalists' New England, 2006. (courtesy of Robert Todd Felton)
View from the site of Thoreau's cabin on Walden Pond toward the pond
View from the site of Thoreau's cabin on Walden Pond toward the pond
from A Journey Into the Transcendentalists' New England, 2006. (courtesy of Robert Todd Felton)




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