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Indians in The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

Indians in The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

Materials prepared by:

Cathy Eaton, Department of English
New Hampshire Technical Institute, Concord, NH

Joseph R. Modugno, Department of English
North Shore Community College, Danvers, MA

A Gleam of Sunshine from chapter entitled "A Flood of Sunshine" in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
A Gleam of Sunshine from chapter entitled "A Flood of Sunshine" in The Scarlet Letter
 
The Scarlet Letter takes place fifteen or twenty years after the settlement of Boston when the wilderness inhabited by Indians encroaches upon the 'civilized' Puritan town. Hester Prynne, who has been imprisoned because she is pregnant and unmarried, is forced to stand before a derogatory crowd on the scaffold outside her jail as an example of one type of outcast or sinner who is typically punished by the Puritans for crimes. Although Indians do not play a major role in The Scarlet Letter, Hawthorne refers to them throughout the novel in their stereotypical role of outcast, heathen, healer, or romanticized dweller of the primordial forests.


Page citation: http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/11412/


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