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Images Related to Indians in "Main-Street"

Pouch with Tassels
Pouch with Tassels
Deerskin Pouch with Fur, Porcupine Quills, and Metal Chimes. Pawtucket Indian Artist. 17th Century.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Pouch with Tassels
Pouch with Tassels
Deerskin Pouch with Fur, Porcupine Quills, and Metal Chimes. Pawtucket Indian Artist. 17th Century.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Black Stone Bear
Black Stone Bear
Black Stone Bear. Igneous Rock. Pawtucket Indian Artist. Ca. 16th Century (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Tray by unidentified Huron artist c. 1840 made of birchbark, moosehair, pigment, and thread
Tray by unidentified Huron artist c. 1840 made of birchbark, moosehair, pigment, and thread
"The design combines Native American beliefs about living harmoniously in the natural environment with an idealized view of nature in European art of the period. Beginning in the seventeenth century, Native American women learned European embroidery techniques at covent schools in Canada established to convert and educate them." (from exhibit notes, "Painted with Thread," Peabody Essex Museum, August 2001) (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Iroquois Ball-mouth War club, 19th Century.
Iroquois Ball-mouth War club, 19th Century.
The club is painted red on one side, black on the other. There is sheet brass decoration on the sides of ball and scalloped carving on the handle edge behind ball. Two small leather bags hang from the top of the club, a leather thong through the base. The “GA-JE-WA” was a heavy weapon, usually made of ironwood, with a large ball of knot at the head. It was generally about two feet in length, and the base five or six inches in diameter. In close combat it would prove a formidable weapon.  Courtesy of The New York State Museum: The University Of the State of New York
Iroquois Deer-Antler War Club, 19th Century.
Iroquois Deer-Antler War Club, 19th Century.
This type of war club was commonly used. In the lower edge, a sharp-pointed deer's antler, about four inches in length, was inserted to create a dangerous weapon that would inflict a deep wound in close combat.  Courtesy of The New York State Museum: The University Of the State of New York
Detail of a 19th Century Iroquois Wampum Belt (\"kaswénhta\")
Detail of a 19th Century Iroquois Wampum Belt ("kaswénhta")
This is a close-up of the "Lewis H. Morgan Belt," made of shell wampum beads and bound with blue and pink silk damask on each end. There are nine open white diamonds and one open square on a purple background. It was made for Morgan at the Tonawanda Reservation, using beads he bought from the daughter of Joseph Brant. The white and purple shell beads known as wampum had great ritual value among the Iroquois. Wampum was presented as gifts on special occasions such as funerals, and might be used as reparation for crimes such as murder. Wampum belts were used to commemorate important events such as treaties; their designs relayed messages related to the particular event. The word wampum is not of Iroquois origin. . . . It was first known in New England as “Wampumpeag, “ from which its Algonquin [Algonquian] derivation is to be inferred.  Courtesy of The New York State Museum: The University Of the State of New York
Virginia Indians by John White
Virginia Indians by John White
Detail of Virginia Indians by John White 
Early Drawing of American Indians
Early Drawing of American Indians
Early Drawing of American Indians 
Nesouaquoit (Sauk and Fox)
Nesouaquoit (Sauk and Fox)
Nesouaquoit (Sauk and Fox), McKenney and Hall Folio Plate  (courtesy of The Philadelphia Print Shop.)
An Indian Dance
An Indian Dance
From The Histoire of Travaile into Virginia Britannia by William Strachey, Gent. 
Indian Village (From Hariot's \"Relation\")
Indian Village (From Hariot's "Relation")
Illustration from A Popular History of the United States by William Cullen Bryant. New York, Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1896.  (courtesy of The Boston Public Library.)
The Squaw Sachem Sells Her Land to John Winthrop
The Squaw Sachem Sells Her Land to John Winthrop
Mural of Squaw Sachem selling land that becomes Winchester, Massachusetts to John Winthrop by Aiden L. Ripley in the Winchester Public Library (courtesy of the Town of Winchester, MA)
Reproduction of an Old Style Algonquin Indian Birchbark Canoe. Sixteen Feet Long.  Made by Henri Vaillancourt, Greenville, NH.
Reproduction of an Old Style Algonquin Indian Birchbark Canoe. Sixteen Feet Long. Made by Henri Vaillancourt, Greenville, NH.
This traditional Algonquin birchbark canoe is based on a centuries-old design and is an example of a type of canoe used by New England Indians.  (courtesy of Henri Vaillancourt.)
Abenaki Style Birch Bark Canoe.
Abenaki Style Birch Bark Canoe.
This Abenaki style birch bark canoe was made by Henri Vaillancourt, Greenville, NH, using traditonal materials and methods. A similar example is in the Peabody Essex Museum collection.  (courtesy of Henri Vaillancourt.)
William Wood, <I>New England's Prospect,</I> 1634.
William Wood, New England's Prospect, 1634.
The title page of William Wood's New England's Prospect, which includes some of the first English desciptions of the Indians and the flora and fauna of Essex County, Massachusetts. The work, published in London in 1634, includes advice and cautions to prospective settlers and some of New England's first nature poetry. Wood visited Salem in 1629, when John Endecott was still heading the small group of settlers before the arrival of John Winthrop in 1630. With Winthrop came more than a thousand followers and the royal charter that marked the beginning of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and the founding of Boston.  
The Roger Conant (1592-1679) Statue at Washington Square North
The Roger Conant (1592-1679) Statue at Washington Square North
Roger Conant was among the group of settlers called the Old Planters who left Cape Ann in 1626 to settle in Salem, then called Nahum-Keike by the Indians and later, Naumkeag. Hawthorne mentions this first settler of Salem in "Main-Street," calling Conant "...of that class of men who do not merely find, but make, their place in the system of human affairs; a man of thoughtful strength...." Hawthorne depicts Conant and his wife as having projected "...an Eden in their hearts..." onto their new home in Naumkeag. (photography by Bruce Hibbard)
Roger Conant Autograph
Roger Conant Autograph
The Autograph of Roger Conant (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Site of the Old Planters Settlement at Salem
Site of the Old Planters Settlement at Salem
The site of "the Old Planters" houses in Salem.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
View of the \"Northfields\" section of Salem.
View of the "Northfields" section of Salem.
A view of "Northfields," across from Salem Neck, the site of the original settlement by Salem's "Old Planters." The Northfields section of Salem (extending from Salem's North River north to Peabody and Danversport) was the place where, according to Rev. John Higginson, the remnants of the once-populous Naumkeag Indians had their "Towne of Wigwams" in the 1620s. It was also the place where both Indians and Salem's first English settlers planted their corn.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Pioneer Village Postcard
Pioneer Village Postcard
Pioneer Village Postcard Courtesy of Dark Horse Antiques, Dorchester, MA Darkhorseantiques@verizon.net
Pioneer Village Postcard
Pioneer Village Postcard
Pioneer Village Postcard  Courtesy of Dark Horse Antiques, Dorchester, MA Darkhorseantiques@verizon.net
Pioneer Village Postcard
Pioneer Village Postcard
Pioneer Village Postcard  Courtesy of Dark Horse Antiques, Dorchester, MA Darkhorseantiques@verizon.net
Pioneer Village Postcard
Pioneer Village Postcard
Pioneer Village Postcard  Courtesy of Dark Horse Antiques, Dorchester, MA Darkhorseantiques@verizon.net
Portrait of Governor John Endecott (1588?-1665)
Portrait of Governor John Endecott (1588?-1665)
In 1628 John Endecott came to Naumkeag with a patent for land and a group of about 60 settlers. They joined Roger Conant and "the Old Planters" (members of the failed Cape Ann settlement of 1624), who had established a settlement in 1626, along a sheltered cove facing what are now the North and Danvers Rivers in Salem. Endecott governed the colony until he was replaced by John Winthrop in 1630. This portrait was painted a few months before Endecott's death in 1665. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
John Endecott Family Burial Ground in Danvers, Massachusetts.
John Endecott Family Burial Ground in Danvers, Massachusetts.
The entrance to the Endecott Family Burial plot in Danvers. The burial ground overlooks the Crane River and is situated on a former campsite of the Naumkeag Indians. It has been used as a burial place since the 1650s and contains many of Governor Endecott's relatives, as well as two British soldiers who died while on duty in Danvers.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Pear Tree Brought from England and Planted in 1632 by Gov. John Endecott
Pear Tree Brought from England and Planted in 1632 by Gov. John Endecott
Endecott Pear Tree Danvers, Massachusetts Frank Cousins Photo, 1891.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Early Seal of Massachusetts Bay Colony
Early Seal of Massachusetts Bay Colony
Seal of Massachusetts Bay Colony, in use 1629-1684. This silver seal was first used by Gov. John Endecott. The Indian's words, "Come over and help us," express the early missionary purpose behind English colonization.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
John Winthrop (1588-1649), Governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony, 1630-1649, engraving
John Winthrop (1588-1649), Governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony, 1630-1649, engraving
On June 12, 1630, John Winthrop, on board the flagship Arbella, landed at Naumkeag (Salem) and replaced John Endecott as governor. Soon after, Winthrop and his fleet of ships and Puritan colonists went on to "Mystic River" (Charlestown) and then to the Shawmut Peninsula (Boston). With the coming of Winthrop and the founding of Massachusetts Bay Colony, the "Puritan Experiment" in New England began. Rapid settlement occurred between 1630 and 1642, when approximately 21,000 English immigrants arrived in New England. The Puritan emigrants and their descendants set out to create a society based on Scripture, and as John Winthrop declared, one that should be a "Model of Christian Charity," "a city upon a hill." From vol. 1 , S. Perley's The History of Salem Massachusetts, 1924, p. 188  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Engraving of Salem from John W. Barber's <I>Collections</I>, 1839, Worcester
Engraving of Salem from John W. Barber's Collections, 1839, Worcester
Salem View, 1839. Looking North on Washington Street from the intersection of Front Street. City Hall is the building with pillars on the right.  
King Philip of Mount Hope by Paul Revere
King Philip of Mount Hope by Paul Revere
Metacom (or Metacomet), whom the English called King Philip, was the son of Massasoit and the Wampanoag sachem who led the uprising against the English between 1675-76. "King Philip's War," as the English named it, was one of the most economically and psychologically devastating events in New England history. Massacres and property destruction raged all over New England. It ended with Metacom shot to death in a Rhode Island swamp and the breakup of the Indian nations of eastern Massachusetts. Metacom's body was quartered and the parts hung from trees. His decapitated head was staked on a pole in Plymouth Colony, where it remained on view for more than twenty-five years. In his History of the War, Increase Mather commented with satisfaction that Philip was “hewed in pieces before the Lord.”  (courtesy of The American Antiquarian Society.)
\"Death of King Philip\"
"Death of King Philip"
From Heroism of Hannah Duston : together with the Indian Wars of New England, 1874, by Robert Boodey Caverly (1806-1887).  
Portrait of Cotton Mather (1663-1723)
Portrait of Cotton Mather (1663-1723)
Cotton Mather was one of Puritan New England's most influential ministers and leaders. He was famous for his writings, histories such as Magnalia Christi Americana and those that helped stir up support for the Salem Witchcraft Trials of 1692. He also promoted learning and early scientific knowledge in New England. He worked for acceptance of the smallpox vaccine and wrote a treatise on medicine called The Angel of Bethesda.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Cotton Mather
Cotton Mather
Portrait of Cotton Mather from Perley's History of Salem, Massachusetts. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
The Death of Jane McCrea\" by John Vanderlyn  1804
The Death of Jane McCrea" by John Vanderlyn 1804
The Death of Jane McCrea by John Vanderlyn 1804  
American Progress by John Gast  1872
American Progress by John Gast 1872
American Progress by John Gast 1872  
Indian Chief Contemplating the Progress of Civilization
Indian Chief Contemplating the Progress of Civilization
Indian Chief Contemplating the Progress of Civilization  
Cover of <i>Main- Street</i> by Nathaniel Hawthorne with introduction by Julian Hawthorne (1901)
Cover of Main- Street by Nathaniel Hawthorne with introduction by Julian Hawthorne (1901)
Kirgate Press, Lewis Budd 3rd, at "Hillside" in Canton, PA (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
Frontispiece depicting Main Street(Essex Street) in Salem
Frontispiece depicting Main Street(Essex Street) in Salem
from Main-Street by Nathaniel Hawthorne with introduction by Julian Hawthorne (1901)Kirgate Press, Lewis Budd 3rd, at "Hillside" in Canton, PA (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)



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