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Images Related to "The Duston Family"

Images Related to "The Duston Family"

Illustrations from Books and Magazines
Related Title Pages
Old Postcards and Photographs
Arts and Crafts
Burial Grounds and Grave Markers
Maps

Illustrations from Books and Magazines

\"The Escape of the Duston Family,\" illustration from \"The Duston Family\" by Nathaniel Hawthorne.
"The Escape of the Duston Family," illustration from "The Duston Family" by Nathaniel Hawthorne.
From The American Magazine of Useful and Entertaining Knowledge vol. II, published by the Boston Bewick Company, 1836 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Hannah Duston's Escape from Contoocook Island, New Hampshire, 1697.
Hannah Duston's Escape from Contoocook Island, New Hampshire, 1697.
Hannah Duston's Escape from Contoocook Island, New Hampshire (now known as Dustin Island) on the night of March 29th-30th, 1697. The two-acre island is at the junction of the Merrimack and Contoocook Rivers north of Concord. Samuel Leonardson, the fourteen-year-old English boy, is also seen in the illustration assisting in the killing of the Indians. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
The Captive Maidens
The Captive Maidens
Illustration from A Popular History of the United States by William Cullen Bryant. New York, Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1896.  (courtesy of The Boston Public Library.)
The Massacre of Ann Hutchinson
The Massacre of Ann Hutchinson
Illustration from A Popular History of the United States by William Cullen Bryant. New York, Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1896.  (courtesy of The Boston Public Library.)
Indian Attack on an Outlying Plantation
Indian Attack on an Outlying Plantation
Illustration from A Popular History of the United States by William Cullen Bryant. New York, Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1896.  (courtesy of The Boston Public Library.)
Boone And Calloway Rescued
Boone And Calloway Rescued
A line-cut illustration from First white man of the West, or, The life and exploits of Col. Dan'l Boone, the first settler of Kentucky; interspersed with incidents in the early annals of the country by Timothy Flint, 1854, depicting a rescue of pioneers from the Indians.  (courtesy of University of Kentucky Library.)
Encounter With Indians
Encounter With Indians
A line-cut illustration from First white man of the West, or, The life and exploits of Col. Dan'l Boone, the first settler of Kentucky; interspersed with incidents in the early annals of the country by Timothy Flint, 1854. (courtesy of University of Kentucky Library.)
Execution Of A Prisoner
Execution Of A Prisoner
In First white man of the West, or, The life and exploits of Col. Dan'l Boone, the first settler of Kentucky; interspersed with incidents in the early annals of the country,Timothy Flint relates the story of Boone’s captivity among the Shawnese Indians and the "mercy killing" of a brave enemy warrior from a western tribe.  (courtesy of University of Kentucky Library.)
Illustration from Mary Rowlandson's Captivity Narrative, 1770 Edition.
Illustration from Mary Rowlandson's Captivity Narrative, 1770 Edition.
Frontispiece of Mary Rowlandson's Captivity Narrative, 1770 Edition. (courtesy of The American Antiquarian Society.)
Robert Boodey Caverly
Robert Boodey Caverly
From Heroism of Hannah Duston : together with the Indian Wars of New England, 1874, by Robert Boodey Caverly (1806-1887).  
\"The Marsh Garrison House\"
"The Marsh Garrison House"
From Heroism of Hannah Duston : together with the Indian Wars of New England, 1874, by Robert Boodey Caverly (1806-1887).  
\"Crossing to Contoocook Island\"
"Crossing to Contoocook Island"
From Heroism of Hannah Duston : together with the Indian Wars of New England, 1874, by Robert Boodey Caverly (1806-1887).  
\"Dustin, Neff, and Leonardson\"
"Dustin, Neff, and Leonardson"
From Heroism of Hannah Duston : together with the Indian Wars of New England, 1874, by Robert Boodey Caverly (1806-1887).  
\"Death of King Philip\"
"Death of King Philip"
From Heroism of Hannah Duston : together with the Indian Wars of New England, 1874, by Robert Boodey Caverly (1806-1887).  
\"Chocorua Wept\"
"Chocorua Wept"
From Heroism of Hannah Duston : together with the Indian Wars of New England, 1874, by Robert Boodey Caverly (1806-1887).  
Hannah Duston Statue, Contoocook Island, \"First Draft\"
Hannah Duston Statue, Contoocook Island, "First Draft"
From Heroism of Hannah Duston : together with the Indian Wars of New England, 1874, by Robert Boodey Caverly (1806-1887).  
Indian Village (From Hariot's \"Relation\")
Indian Village (From Hariot's "Relation")
Illustration from A Popular History of the United States by William Cullen Bryant. New York, Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1896.  (courtesy of The Boston Public Library.)
Title Page of <i>Captivity Narrative of Hannah Duston,</i>1987
Title Page of Captivity Narrative of Hannah Duston,1987
Woodblock prints by Richard Bosman and introduction by Glenn Todd (courtesy of Arion Press, San Francisco, and artist Richard Bosman)
Frontispiece woodblock print by Richard Bosman
Frontispiece woodblock print by Richard Bosman
From from Captivity Narrative of Hannah Duston,1987  (courtesy of Arion Press, San Francisco, and artist Richard Bosman)
Beginning of Hannah Duston story by Nathaniel Hawthorne (p. 31); woodblock print illustrations by Richard Bosman
Beginning of Hannah Duston story by Nathaniel Hawthorne (p. 31); woodblock print illustrations by Richard Bosman
From from Captivity Narrative of Hannah Duston,1987  (courtesy of Arion Press, San Francisco, and artist Richard Bosman)
\"Carcasses on the Ground\" (p. 32); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
"Carcasses on the Ground" (p. 32); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
From from Captivity Narrative of Hannah Duston,1987  (courtesy of Arion Press, San Francisco, and artist Richard Bosman)
\"For Birds to Feed Upon\" (p. 33); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
"For Birds to Feed Upon" (p. 33); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
From from Captivity Narrative of Hannah Duston,1987  (courtesy of Arion Press, San Francisco, and artist Richard Bosman)
\"Through the Wilderness\" (p. 34); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
"Through the Wilderness" (p. 34); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
From from Captivity Narrative of Hannah Duston,1987  (courtesy of Arion Press, San Francisco, and artist Richard Bosman)
\"An Uncertain March\"(p. 35); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
"An Uncertain March"(p. 35); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
From from Captivity Narrative of Hannah Duston,1987  (courtesy of Arion Press, San Francisco, and artist Richard Bosman)
\"Pouring Out Her Soul\"(p. 36); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
"Pouring Out Her Soul"(p. 36); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
From from Captivity Narrative of Hannah Duston,1987  (courtesy of Arion Press, San Francisco, and artist Richard Bosman)
\"Prayers Thrice Every Day\" (p. 37); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
"Prayers Thrice Every Day" (p. 37); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
From from Captivity Narrative of Hannah Duston,1987  (courtesy of Arion Press, San Francisco, and artist Richard Bosman)
\"Wigwams of Her Captors\" (p. 38); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
"Wigwams of Her Captors" (p. 38); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
From from Captivity Narrative of Hannah Duston,1987  (courtesy of Arion Press, San Francisco, and artist Richard Bosman)
\"Around a Fire\" (p. 39); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
"Around a Fire" (p. 39); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
From from Captivity Narrative of Hannah Duston,1987  (courtesy of Arion Press, San Francisco, and artist Richard Bosman)
\"A Deep, Dead Slumber\" (p. 40); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
"A Deep, Dead Slumber" (p. 40); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
From from Captivity Narrative of Hannah Duston,1987  (courtesy of Arion Press, San Francisco, and artist Richard Bosman)
\"Killed In Their Sleep\" (p. 41);woodblock print by Richard Bosman
"Killed In Their Sleep" (p. 41);woodblock print by Richard Bosman
From from Captivity Narrative of Hannah Duston,1987  (courtesy of Arion Press, San Francisco, and artist Richard Bosman)
\"Suddenly Waked and Skuttled Away\" (p. 42); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
"Suddenly Waked and Skuttled Away" (p. 42); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
From from Captivity Narrative of Hannah Duston,1987  (courtesy of Arion Press, San Francisco, and artist Richard Bosman)
\"Escaped, Dreadfully Wounded\" (p. 43);woodblock print by Richard Bosman
"Escaped, Dreadfully Wounded" (p. 43);woodblock print by Richard Bosman
From from Captivity Narrative of Hannah Duston,1987  (courtesy of Arion Press, San Francisco, and artist Richard Bosman)
\"Proofs Of What They Had Done\" (p. 44); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
"Proofs Of What They Had Done" (p. 44); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
From from Captivity Narrative of Hannah Duston,1987  (courtesy of Arion Press, San Francisco, and artist Richard Bosman)
\"Long Black Hair\" (p. 45); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
"Long Black Hair" (p. 45); woodblock print by Richard Bosman
From from Captivity Narrative of Hannah Duston,1987  (courtesy of Arion Press, San Francisco, and artist Richard Bosman)

Related Title Pages

Title Page from the <I/>American Magazine of Useful and Entertaining Knowledge</I>, Boston, 1836.
Title Page from the American Magazine of Useful and Entertaining Knowledge, Boston, 1836.
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
<I/>A True History of the Captivity & Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, A Minister's Wife in New-England,</I> London, 1682.
A True History of the Captivity & Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, A Minister's Wife in New-England, London, 1682.
Title Page of the London Edition of Mary Rowlandson's Captivity Narrative, 1682, the first captivity narrative to become a best-seller. 
Title Page Illustration from Mary Rowlandson's Captivity Narrative, 1773 Edition.
Title Page Illustration from Mary Rowlandson's Captivity Narrative, 1773 Edition.
Title Page Illustration from Mary Rowlandson's Captivity Narrative, 1773 Edition. (courtesy of The American Antiquarian Society.)
Title page and illustration from <I/>A Narrative of the Captivity, Sufferings, and Removes of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson</I>,Boston: John Boyle, 1773.
Title page and illustration from A Narrative of the Captivity, Sufferings, and Removes of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson,Boston: John Boyle, 1773.
Mary Rowlandson's captivity narrative, first published in 1682, was reprinted and reedited throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The book was especially popular during times of national crisis. It is a classic example of Puritan prose style and method.  (courtesy of The American Antiquarian Society.)
Title page, Increase Mather's <I/>A Brief History of the War with the Indians in New England,</I> Boston, 1676.
Title page, Increase Mather's A Brief History of the War with the Indians in New England, Boston, 1676.
Increase Mather's history was one of the first of many colonial post-war texts that made sense of Metacomet's uprising through the Puritan view of history. The slaying of Metacomet [or Metacom] in August 1676 ended the Indian threat to the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Indian resistance to English colonization and expansion continued, however, well into the eighteenth century on the northern and western frontiers. In 1692, Increase Mather’s eldest son, Cotton Mather, would write, "Our Indian wars are not over yet." He went on to write his own history and interpretation of the continuing conflicts between Indians and Puritans and in the process helped define the mythology of the Puritan captivity narrative.  (courtesy of The American Antiquarian Society.)
Title Page, William Hubbard's <I/>Narrative of the Troubles with the Indians</I>, Boston, 1677.
Title Page, William Hubbard's Narrative of the Troubles with the Indians, Boston, 1677.
William Hubbard, Minister of Ipswich  (courtesy of The American Antiquarian Society.)
Title Page, <I/>The Whole Booke of Psalms,</I>
Cambridge, 1640. ©The Huntington Library
Title Page, The Whole Booke of Psalms, Cambridge, 1640. ©The Huntington Library
The "Bay Psalm Book," the name generally given to The Whole Booke of Psalms, was the authorized hymnal of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and the first book printed in the English colonies. John Cotton wrote the Preface and Richard Mather, John Eliot, and Thomas Weld did the translation.  (courtesy of The Huntington Library, San Marino, CA)
Title Page, John Eliot's Indian Bible, 1663.
Title Page, John Eliot's Indian Bible, 1663.
John Eliot was an English missionary who came to Boston in 1631 and preached to the Massachusetts Indians in their native language. He translated the Bible into the local Indian language and helped set up "Praying Towns" around the colony. He became known as "the Apostle to the Indians."  
Title Page of the Second Edition of Mary Rowlandson's <I/>The Soveraignty & Goodness of God, Together, With the Faithfulness of His Promises Displayed; Being a Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson,</I> 1682, Cambridge, 1682.
Title Page of the Second Edition of Mary Rowlandson's The Soveraignty & Goodness of God, Together, With the Faithfulness of His Promises Displayed; Being a Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, 1682, Cambridge, 1682.
Rowlandson's narrative of her 11-week captivity among the New England Indians during King Philip's War is the original and classic Indian captivity narrative. It was the model from which the popular literary genre developed. The Soveraignty and Goodness of God was the first published narrative by an English-American woman and one of the first best-sellers in American literature. It was printed in 1682 in both London and in Cambridge. The London edition bore the title A True History of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, A Minister's Wife in New England, downplaying the Puritan religious interpretation of the experience. Coincidently, Mary Rowlandson had a male Indian servant in her Lancaster house that twenty years later would be Hannah Duston's captor and "master.” Gordon M. Sayre states that Rowlandson's narrative provides the "foundation of a myth that transcends literature, reaching deep into Anglo-America's history and psyche."  (courtesy of The Boston Public Library.)
Title Page, Cotton Mather's <I/>Magnalia Christi Americana</I>, 1702.  London: Printed for Thomas Parkhurst, at the Bible and three crowns in Cheapside, 1702.
Title Page, Cotton Mather's Magnalia Christi Americana, 1702. London: Printed for Thomas Parkhurst, at the Bible and three crowns in Cheapside, 1702.
"The Great Works of Christ in America"—Mather's history of colonial Massachussetts is a major work of early New England history through the Puritan imagination. In the General Introduction Mather states: "I WRITE the WONDERS of the CHRISTIAN RELIGION, flying from the depravations of Europe, to the American Strand; and, assisted by the Holy Author of that Religion, I do with all conscience of Truth, required therein by Him, who is the Truth itself, report the wonderful displays of His infinite Power, Wisdom, Goodness, and Faithfulness, wherewith His Divine Providenee hath irradiated an Indian Wilderness."  (courtesy of The Boston Public Library.)
Title Page of the First Book of Cotton Mather's <I/>Magnalia Christi Americana</I>, 1702.
Title Page of the First Book of Cotton Mather's Magnalia Christi Americana, 1702.
Magnalia Christi Americana, 1702, Book One. (courtesy of The Boston Public Library.)
<I/>The Starshine of Mrs. Hannah Dustin</I> by Helen deN. Ford, 1976.
The Starshine of Mrs. Hannah Dustin by Helen deN. Ford, 1976.
"The path of the just is as the shining light that shineth more and more unto the perfect day," Prov. 4:18. Helen Ford's book is a mosaic on Hannah Duston and the Indian raid on Haverhill, Massachusetts, March 1697. 
War and Pestilence, Indian Massacre
War and Pestilence, Indian Massacre
War and Pestilence, Indian Massacre 

Old Postcards and Photographs

The Hannah Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
The Hannah Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
Duston Memorial, Haverhill (courtesy of The Story of Hannah Duston/Dustin of Haverhill, Massachusetts website)
Old Postcard of Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
Old Postcard of Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
Hannah Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts. (courtesy of The Story of Hannah Duston/Dustin of Haverhill, Massachusetts Website )
Hannah Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts
Hannah Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts
Hannah Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts (courtesy of The Story of Hannah Duston/Dustin of Haverhill, Massachusetts Website )
Old Postcard of the Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
Old Postcard of the Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
Hannah Duston Memorial, Haverhill, Massachusetts.  (courtesy of The Story of Hannah Duston/Dustin of Haverhill, Massachusetts Website )
Old Postcard of the Hannah Duston Memorial, Penacook, NH.
Old Postcard of the Hannah Duston Memorial, Penacook, NH.
Hannah Duston Memorial, Contoocook Island, New Hampshire. (courtesy of The Story of Hannah Duston/Dustin of Haverhill, Massachusetts Website )
Old Postcard of the Duston Memorial, Contoocook Island, Penacook, NH.
Old Postcard of the Duston Memorial, Contoocook Island, Penacook, NH.
Hannah Duston Memorial, Contoocook Island, New Hampshire. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Old Postcard of the Jonathan Duston House Site, Monument Street, Haverhill, MA.
Old Postcard of the Jonathan Duston House Site, Monument Street, Haverhill, MA.
The Duston boulder (location of the home of Jonathan Duston with whom Hannah lived in her final years. Local history tells us that Haverhill's immense Duston boulder marks the site of Jonathan Duston's home, where Mrs. Duston lived her final years with a son. Haverhill public library records say it took 30 horses with 14 drivers to haul it to the present location. Its weight is estimated at from 30 to 60 tons. Hannah Duston died at this location in 1736.  (courtesy of The Story of Hannah Duston/Dustin of Haverhill, Massachusetts Website )
Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts
Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts
The monument stands on the site of the Second Church, of which Hannah Duston became a member in 1724.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts
Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts
The Hannah Duston Monument was the first statue erected in the United States to honor a woman.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
The original small axe or hatchet held here by Hannah Duston can be found today in the Haverhill Historical Society. The Duston hatchet is not a tomahawk. It is usually called a biscayan or biscayenne, a common trade item of the late seventeenth-century New England frontier. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Close-up of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
Close-up of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
Hannah Duston Monument (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
One of the four plaques on the base of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
One of the four plaques on the base of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
The capture of Hannah Duston and Mary Neff (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
One of the four plaques on the base of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
One of the four plaques on the base of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
Hannah Duston's husband defending the Duston children  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
One of the four plaques on the base of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
One of the four plaques on the base of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
The slaying of the Abenaki Indians  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Detail of one of the four plaques on the base of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
Detail of one of the four plaques on the base of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
Sleeping Abenaki Indians on the Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts. Hannah and two other English captives killed ten of the twelve sleeping Indians on an island camp in the Merrimack River in March or April of 1697.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
One of the four plaques on the base of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
One of the four plaques on the base of the Hannah Duston Monument, Haverhill, Massachusetts.
The escape of Hannah Duston, Mary Neff, and Samuel Lenorson (Lennardson) down the Merrimack River  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
The 35 foot granite monument and statue of Hannah Duston was placed at the site of the escape in 1874. The front, or Westerly side of the monument, is inscribd with the following: "Heroum Gesta Fides-Justitia. Hannah Duston Mary Neff, Samuel Leonardson March 30, 1697, Midnight.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
The 35 foot granite monument and statue of Hannah Duston, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
The 35 foot granite monument and statue of Hannah Duston, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
The monument was erected in 1874 on the site of the escape. On the easterly side of the monument, facing the river, the following comment is inscribed: March 15 1697 30. The War-Whoops-Tomahawks-Fagot and Infanticides were at Haverhill, the ashes of the camp-fires at night and ten of the tribe are here. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
Granite statue of Hannah Duston holding a hatchet and ten Indian scalps. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
A View of the Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire
A View of the Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire
Granite statue of Hannah Duston. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
A View of the Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
A View of the Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
Granite statue of Hannah Duston. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
A View of the Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
A View of the Hannah Duston Monument, Contoocook Island, Penacook, New Hampshire.
Granite statue of Hannah Duston  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
A View of the Merrimack River Along Contoocook Island, Penacook, NH.
A View of the Merrimack River Along Contoocook Island, Penacook, NH.
Contoocook Island, also known as Dustin and Sugar Ball Island, is at the junction of the Merrimack and Contoocook Rivers near Concord, NH. It is approximately two acres, level, and protected as by a moat. The Indians used it as a place of encampment, refuge, and council. It was also a stopover on the several Indian trade routes of the area. It was here that Hannah Duston and her companions killed ten Indians and escaped in a birch bark canoe in the early hours of March 31, 1697. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
A View of the Merrimack River, looking south  from Contoocook Island, Penacook, NH.
A View of the Merrimack River, looking south from Contoocook Island, Penacook, NH.
Contoocook Island is approximately 40 miles in a straight line from Haverhill, but the captives of the March 15, 1697 Indian raid covered over a hundred miles as they wound their way through the late-winter wilderness of southern and central New Hampshire. One tradition holds that Hannah Duston began her journey with only one shoe. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
A View of the Merrimack River From Contoocook Island, Penacook, NH
A View of the Merrimack River From Contoocook Island, Penacook, NH
The Merrimack River, from Contoocook Island. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Cardinal Flowers (Lobelia cardinalis) growing along the Merrimack River at the edge of Contoocook Island, Penacook, NH.
Cardinal Flowers (Lobelia cardinalis) growing along the Merrimack River at the edge of Contoocook Island, Penacook, NH.
This native wildflower is quite uncommon, but may be found along streams and ponds in the eastern United States. Cardinal flowers time their blooms with the late-summer and fall migration of hummingbirds, who are attracted to the brilliant red flowers. Tradition holds that the scarlet-red flower was named for the red robes worn by cardinals in the Catholic Church. American Indians used infusions and decoctions of cardinal flower to treat all sorts of real and imagined afflictions.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Close up of Cardinal Flowers (Lobelia cardinalis) growing on Contoocook Island.
Close up of Cardinal Flowers (Lobelia cardinalis) growing on Contoocook Island.
American Indians used this and other Lobelias to treat worms, stomach problems and syphilis. The root was part of a Native American love potion and the powder of the entire plant may have been used as sort of a magic power to dispel storms and was used in ceremonies. One legend claims that touching the root of this plant will bring love to the lives of elderly women. The plant, however, contains poisonous alkaloids and ingestion has caused illness and even deaths in humans. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)

Arts and Crafts

The 1973 collectible \"Hannah Duston\" Jim Beam bottle: \"4/5 quart 180 month old 86 proof. Beam Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey.\"
The 1973 collectible "Hannah Duston" Jim Beam bottle: "4/5 quart 180 month old 86 proof. Beam Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey."
"Hannah Duston" Jim Beam bottle. The bottle is described as, "A beautiful, Regal China creation --handcrafted." 1973 Jim Beam. 
Painting of the Capture of Hannah Duston and Mary Neff.
Painting of the Capture of Hannah Duston and Mary Neff.
The Indian Raid on Haverhill, Massachusetts (originally called Pentucket), occurred in the early morning of March 15, 1697. Apparently, the band of Penacook and, possibly, Nipmuck Indians met little resistance as they began their assault. The Duston house, located on the northwesterly edge of the settlement, was the first to be attacked. The raiding Indians went on to burn several other houses and kill twenty-seven inhabitants of the settlement. Thirteen people, including Hannah Duston and her nurse, the widow Mary Neff, were carried off into New Hampshire. Traveling with the Indians was the boy, Samuel Lenorson, who had been captured in Worcester two years earlier. He befriended the women and stayed with them on Contoocook Island, while the other Haverhill captives travelled onward to Canada. Lenorson’s knowledge of the Merrimack and Contoocook Rivers may have assisted the women in their dangerous escape on March 30, 1697. (courtesy of The Story of Hannah Duston/Dustin of Haverhill, Massachusetts Website )
The Trapper's Bride, by the Baltimore artist, Alfred Jacob Miller (1810-1874).
The Trapper's Bride, by the Baltimore artist, Alfred Jacob Miller (1810-1874).
The Trapper's Bride, by the Baltimore artist, Alfred Jacob Miller (1810-1874).  
Samuel Lenorson Housesite Marker, Worcester, Massachusetts
Samuel Lenorson Housesite Marker, Worcester, Massachusetts
Tablet on Davis Tower, Lake Park, Quinsigamond State Park, Worcester, MA. It was placed by the Worcester Society of Antiquities in 1910 but stolen in the 1960s. The tablet reads: "On this site stood the home of Samuel Lenorson. This tablet is erected in memory of his son Samuel who at twelve years of age was stolen by the Indians in 1695. His master joined in the attack on Haverhill in 1697, assisting in the capture of Mrs. Hannah Dustin and Mrs. Neff. On the march toward Canada while encamped on an island near Concord, N. H., these captives, led by Mrs. Dustin, killed ten of the Indians and thus regaining their liberty returned to their homes."  
King Philip of Mount Hope by Paul Revere
King Philip of Mount Hope by Paul Revere
Metacom (or Metacomet), whom the English called King Philip, was the son of Massasoit and the Wampanoag sachem who led the uprising against the English between 1675-76. "King Philip's War," as the English named it, was one of the most economically and psychologically devastating events in New England history. Massacres and property destruction raged all over New England. It ended with Metacom shot to death in a Rhode Island swamp and the breakup of the Indian nations of eastern Massachusetts. Metacom's body was quartered and the parts hung from trees. His decapitated head was staked on a pole in Plymouth Colony, where it remained on view for more than twenty-five years. In his History of the War, Increase Mather commented with satisfaction that Philip was “hewed in pieces before the Lord.”  (courtesy of The American Antiquarian Society.)
<I/>The Last of the Wampanoags</I> by G.I. Brown.  Engraved by G.E. Ellis, c. 1850.
The Last of the Wampanoags by G.I. Brown. Engraved by G.E. Ellis, c. 1850.
The Last of the Wampanoags by G.I. Brown. Engraved by G.E. Ellis, c. 1850.  (courtesy of Harvard College Library)
Cotton Mather
Cotton Mather
Portrait of Cotton Mather from Perley's History of Salem, Massachusetts. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Portrait of Cotton Mather (1663-1723)
Portrait of Cotton Mather (1663-1723)
Cotton Mather was one of Puritan New England's most influential ministers and leaders. He was famous for his writings, histories such as Magnalia Christi Americana and those that helped stir up support for the Salem Witchcraft Trials of 1692. He also promoted learning and early scientific knowledge in New England. He worked for acceptance of the smallpox vaccine and wrote a treatise on medicine called The Angel of Bethesda.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Samuel G. Goodrich (1793-1860)
Brady Carte de Visite
Samuel G. Goodrich (1793-1860) Brady Carte de Visite
The back of the image reads: "Published by E. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York. From photographic negative, from Brady's National Portrait Gallery." The Portrait Gallery has put online an image of the daguerreotype from which this carte was made.  Image courtesy of Pat Pflieger, merrycoz.org
Samuel G. Goodrich (1793-1860)
Samuel G. Goodrich (1793-1860)
This medal was reproduced for the frontispiece of the first volume of Goodrich's Recollections of a Lifetime (1857). A photo of the original medal appeared on page 401 of Emily Goodrich Smith's "'Peter Parley'--As Known to His Daughter." The photo is less detailed than is the engraving.  Image courtesy of Pat Pflieger, merrycoz.org
Iroquois Ball Head Club, 19th century
Iroquois Ball Head Club, 19th century
The “GA-JE-WA” was a heavy weapon, usually made of ironwood, with a large ball of knot at the head. It was usually about two feet in length, and the base five or six inches in diameter. In close combat it would prove a formidable weapon. 
Iroquois Ball-mouth War club, 19th Century.
Iroquois Ball-mouth War club, 19th Century.
The club is painted red on one side, black on the other. There is sheet brass decoration on the sides of ball and scalloped carving on the handle edge behind ball. Two small leather bags hang from the top of the club, a leather thong through the base. The “GA-JE-WA” was a heavy weapon, usually made of ironwood, with a large ball of knot at the head. It was generally about two feet in length, and the base five or six inches in diameter. In close combat it would prove a formidable weapon.  Courtesy of The New York State Museum: The University Of the State of New York
Iroquois Deer-Antler War Club, 19th Century.
Iroquois Deer-Antler War Club, 19th Century.
This type of war club was commonly used. In the lower edge, a sharp-pointed deer's antler, about four inches in length, was inserted to create a dangerous weapon that would inflict a deep wound in close combat.  Courtesy of The New York State Museum: The University Of the State of New York
Pouch with Tassels
Pouch with Tassels
Deerskin Pouch with Fur, Porcupine Quills, and Metal Chimes. Pawtucket Indian Artist. 17th Century.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Pouch with Tassels
Pouch with Tassels
Deerskin Pouch with Fur, Porcupine Quills, and Metal Chimes. Pawtucket Indian Artist. 17th Century.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Black Stone Bear
Black Stone Bear
Black Stone Bear. Igneous Rock. Pawtucket Indian Artist. Ca. 16th Century (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Burden Strap, Iroquois Artist, 18th Century
Burden Strap, Iroquois Artist, 18th Century
This strap was used to carry bundles while walking. The central portion would have been worn across the forehead. It is made of leather, dyed moose hair, and glass beads.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
An 18 Foot Reproduction Birch Bark Canoe (Henri Vaillancourt, Greenville, NH)
An 18 Foot Reproduction Birch Bark Canoe (Henri Vaillancourt, Greenville, NH)
This birch bark canoe is made in the style of the Indian fur traders of the Northeast.  (courtesy of Henri Vaillancourt.)
Abenaki Style Birch Bark Canoe.
Abenaki Style Birch Bark Canoe.
This Abenaki style birch bark canoe was made by Henri Vaillancourt, Greenville, NH, using traditonal materials and methods. A similar example is in the Peabody Essex Museum collection.  (courtesy of Henri Vaillancourt.)

Burial Grounds and Grave Markers

Gravestone of Capt. Thomas Lake, 1676, Copp's Hill Burial Ground, Boston.
Gravestone of Capt. Thomas Lake, 1676, Copp's Hill Burial Ground, Boston.
Capt. Thomas Lake, who was "perfidiously slain by ye Indians at Kennibeck, August ye 14, 1676."  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Gravestone for French and Indian War Captive Lydia Harwood, Northfield, MA.
Gravestone for French and Indian War Captive Lydia Harwood, Northfield, MA.
Lydia Harwood Her First Husband Asahel Stebbens was killed and she taken prisoner by the Indians Aug. 27, 1757 at No 4 and Carried to Canada. Saved from torture at the stake by her heroism and faith. She returned from captivity and in 1759 married Capt. Samuel Merriem. She died his widow Feb. 2, 1808 Aged 76. (No 4 was a fort at Charleston, NH. The stone was erected in 1874 by descendants.)  Photography and Transcription Courtesy of Tom and Brenda Malloy of The Association for Gravestone Studies.
Gravestone for King George's War Captive Samuel Allen, Deerfield, MA.
Gravestone for King George's War Captive Samuel Allen, Deerfield, MA.
In Memory of Samuel Allen who fell by the Indian Savages April ye 25th 1746 Valiantly Defending his Own Life and Children in ye 45th year of his age.  Photography and Transcription Courtesy of Tom and Brenda Malloy of The Association for Gravestone Studies.
Gravestone for Captain Edward Hutchinson of Marlborough, MA, Killed during King Philip's War.
Gravestone for Captain Edward Hutchinson of Marlborough, MA, Killed during King Philip's War.
Captain Edward Hutchinson Aged 62 years Was shot by the treacherous Indians Aug. 2, 1675 Died 19 August 1675. Erected by the Gen. Jos. Badger Chapter Of the Daughters of the American Revolution Oct. 27,1921. (He was the son of Anne Hutchinson, who was expelled from Massachusetts Bay Colony for sedition in 1638 and later died in an Indian attack in Long Island.)  Photography and Transcription Courtesy of Tom and Brenda Malloy of The Association for Gravestone Studies.
Gravestone for an Indian Captive, Deerfield, MA
Gravestone for an Indian Captive, Deerfield, MA
In memory of Judah Wright who died August 30th, 1747 in the 72nd Year of his age. He was one of the unfortunate who was captured by the Indians Feb. 29th 1703-04.  Photography and Transcription Courtesy of Tom and Brenda Malloy of The Association for Gravestone Studies.
Gravestone for an Indian Captive, Deerfield, MA
Gravestone for an Indian Captive, Deerfield, MA
Here lies the Body of Mrs. Eunice Williams the Virtuous and desirable consort of the Revd. John Williams and daughter to ye Revd. Mr. Eleazer and Mrs. Esther Mather of Northhampton. She was born Aug. 2, 1664 and fell by the Barberous Enemy March 1, 1703-04. (She was captured during the Deerfield raid and then killed when she couldn’t keep up with the other captives. The account was later published by her husband.)  Photography and Transcription Courtesy of Tom and Brenda Malloy of The Association for Gravestone Studies.
Gravestone for a Native American, Lakeville, MA.
Gravestone for a Native American, Lakeville, MA.
In Memory of Ben Simon the last Native American of Middleboro. He was a Revolutionary War Soldier and died in May 1831 aged 80 years.  Photography and Transcription Courtesy of Tom and Brenda Malloy of The Association for Gravestone Studies.

Maps

Map of Northeastern Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire.
Map of Northeastern Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire.
Map of Hannah Duston's escape journey on the Merrimack River, from Contoocook Island in Penacook, NH to Haverhill, MA.  (courtesy of The Story of Hannah Duston/Dustin of Haverhill, Massachusetts Website )
Map of Southern New England Indian Tribes, c. 1600.
Map of Southern New England Indian Tribes, c. 1600.
Map of Southern New England Indian Tribes, c. 1600. 
Indian Lands and Localities in Essex County Massachusetts
Indian Lands and Localities in Essex County Massachusetts
Map of Essex County, Massachusetts from Sidney Perley's Indian Deeds of Essex County, 1912, showing Indian place names and tribal areas.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Contoocook Island and Pennacook Map
Contoocook Island and Pennacook Map
Contoocook Island and Pennacook Map  



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