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Images Related to Female Characters in The House of the Seven Gables

Images Related to Female Characters in The House of the Seven Gables

\"Can it have been an early lover?\" (p. 48) from volume 1 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
"Can it have been an early lover?" (p. 48) from volume 1 of The House of the Seven Gables by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"'You odd little chicken'\" (p. 148) in volume 1 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
"'You odd little chicken'" (p. 148) in volume 1 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"'This has done me good'\" (p. 184) in volume 1 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
"'This has done me good'" (p. 184) in volume 1 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"'I am your kinsman, my dear.'\" (p. 196)in volume 1 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
"'I am your kinsman, my dear.'" (p. 196)in volume 1 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"Faces looked upward to him there\" (p. 258) in volume 1 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
"Faces looked upward to him there" (p. 258) in volume 1 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Edith and Mildred Cowles (Houghton Mifflin, 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"In keeping with the dismal and bitter weather\" (from p. 165) <p>Frontispiece of volume 2 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)</p>
"In keeping with the dismal and bitter weather" (from p. 165)

Frontispiece of volume 2 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)


According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"Like the flowers...beautiful and delicate\" (p. 58) in volume 2 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
"Like the flowers...beautiful and delicate" (p. 58) in volume 2 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"'Look me in the face'\" (p. 106) in volume 2 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
"'Look me in the face'" (p. 106) in volume 2 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
\"'Tell me, tell me!'\" (p. 246) in volume 2 of <i>The House of the Seven Gables</i> illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
"'Tell me, tell me!'" (p. 246) in volume 2 of The House of the Seven Gables illustrated by Maude and Genevieve Cowles (Houghton Mifflin 1899)
According to John L. Idol, Jr., "...the Cowles sisters present characters that seem to breathe, have blood in their veins, thoughts in their minds, and feelings in their hearts. ... I'm suggesting that the Cowles sisters understood an illustrator's role, which is being a collaborative artist capable of helping a reader visualize the words of an author. In an age where the visual receives far more attention than the verbal, the Cowles sisters' illustrations of The House of the Seven Gables should be far better known than they are." (See http://www.hawthorneinsalem.org/page/10174 for a fuller discussion of this topic by Professor Idol.) (courtesy of Nathaniel Hawthorne Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine)
Hepzibah, Phoebe, and Judge Pyncheon depicted on cover of 1977 illustrated edition by Now Age/Pendulum Press of <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I>
Hepzibah, Phoebe, and Judge Pyncheon depicted on cover of 1977 illustrated edition by Now Age/Pendulum Press of The House of the Seven Gables
 (courtesy of Pendulum Press)
Portrait of Abigail Gerrish by John Greenwood c. 1750 which resembles Hepzibah Pyncheon
Portrait of Abigail Gerrish by John Greenwood c. 1750 which resembles Hepzibah Pyncheon
The young woman in the painting is Abigail Gerrish's granddaughter. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
The Shop Bell at the House of the Seven Gables Historic Site
The Shop Bell at the House of the Seven Gables Historic Site
 (courtesy of Shakespeare and Company)
Illustrator's Depiction of Hepzibah's Shop
Illustrator's Depiction of Hepzibah's Shop
From Literary Houses - Ten Famous Houses in Fiction  (courtesy of Facts On File, Inc)
Illustration by Helen Mason Grose of Phoebe in <I>The House of the Seven Gables</I> from the 1924 edition published by Houghton Mifflin
Illustration by Helen Mason Grose of Phoebe in The House of the Seven Gables from the 1924 edition published by Houghton Mifflin
John Idol says, "To Helen Mason Grose goes the honor of having provided the greatest number of full-page illustrations for the romance in an edition appearing in 1924.... As of 1952 this edition had gone through 19 printings, serving readers from the Roaring 'Twenties up to the Baby Boomers. In minutely detailed paintings in color and in woodcuts done in black and white, she presented a prettified, sentimental, and energized set of illustrations. Her characters interact, especially in the paintings, and she showed a knack for choosing dramatic scenes where reader interest in most intense...." (with special thanks to Dr. John L. Idol Jr.)
Picture of chicken yard from <I>House of the Seven Gables</I>
Picture of chicken yard from House of the Seven Gables
 (courtesy of Dr. John L. Idol, Jr.)
Kitchen fireplace
Kitchen fireplace
Fireplace in kitchen in House of Seven Gables. Hepzibah and Phoebe would have prepared meals using such a fireplace. (courtesy of The House of the Seven Gables Historic Site)



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