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Images Related to Hawthorne and Ideas of Good and Evil

Images Related to Hawthorne and Ideas of Good and Evil

Plate II, Adam and Eve, Derby Family Bible, Universal Bible, 1759 ed.
Plate II, Adam and Eve, Derby Family Bible, Universal Bible, 1759 ed.
Print of Adam and Eve as Their Disobedience to God in the Garden of Eden Brings Sin and Death into the World, the Original Sin Precipitating the Fall of All Humanity (courtesy of Salem Maritime National Historic Site)
Adam & Eve Fireback at the House of the Seven Gables Historic Site
Adam & Eve Fireback at the House of the Seven Gables Historic Site
The story of the seduction of Adam and Eve by Satan in the Garden of Eden was common knowledge to residents of Hawthorne's Salem. This fireback shows the snake entwined about the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil and is a dramatic representation of the relationship of men and women to evil and to their acquisition of original sin. (courtesy of The House of the Seven Gables Historic Site)
Arthur Dimmesdale
Arthur Dimmesdale
Fig. 4. Wood engraving by Barry Moser for the Pennyroyal Press from the January 1991 edition of the Essex Institute Historical Collection, vol. 127, no. 1; originally printed in 1984 edition of The Scarlet Letter(New York: Harcourt Brace and Jovanovich, 1984)Referring to the image in the 1984 HBJ edition, Dr. Rita Gollin, author of the essay "The Scarlet Letter," points out that "Mosler's images play an active interpretive role in this edition, particularly this final image showing Arthur Dimmesdale with his eyes downcast and the scar of an "A" clearly visible on his chest" (28). (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Hester on the Scaffold
Hester on the Scaffold
This image appears in the January 1991 edition of the Essex Institute Historical Collection, vol. 127, no. 1. It is a reprint of the illustration by Mary Hallock Foote from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by James R. Osgood. Dr. Rita Gollin, author of the article in the EIHC entitled "The Scarlet Letter" which features this image, notes that "[w]hile Foote was not the first to illustrate the novel, her portraits of Hester are unusual in their reality, dense detail, and centrality to the composition" (17). (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
\"The Eyes of the Wrinkled Scholar Glowed\" from chapter entitled \"The Interview\" of <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
"The Eyes of the Wrinkled Scholar Glowed" from chapter entitled "The Interview" of The Scarlet Letter
Chillingworth is called to prison cell as healer to aid Hester and her ailing Pearl in this illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (87)  
The Leech and his Patient from the chapter of the same name in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
The Leech and his Patient from the chapter of the same name in The Scarlet Letter
Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston. Illustration drawn by Mary Hallock Foote and engraved by A.V.S. Anthony. (165) 
\"He gathered herbs here and there\" from chapter entitled \"Hester and Pearl\" in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
"He gathered herbs here and there" from chapter entitled "Hester and Pearl" in The Scarlet Letter
Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston (213) 
Chillingworth,--\"Smile with a sinister meaning\" from chapter entitled \"The New England Holiday\" in <I>The Scarlet Letter</I>
Chillingworth,--"Smile with a sinister meaning" from chapter entitled "The New England Holiday" in The Scarlet Letter
Illustration from the 1878 edition of The Scarlet Letter published by Charles R. Osgood & Co. in Boston (287)  
Cotton Mather
Cotton Mather
Portrait of Cotton Mather from Perley's History of Salem, Massachusetts. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Portrait of Cotton Mather (1663-1723)
Portrait of Cotton Mather (1663-1723)
Cotton Mather was one of Puritan New England's most influential ministers and leaders. He was famous for his writings, histories such as Magnalia Christi Americana and those that helped stir up support for the Salem Witchcraft Trials of 1692. He also promoted learning and early scientific knowledge in New England. He worked for acceptance of the smallpox vaccine and wrote a treatise on medicine called The Angel of Bethesda.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
The Black Man of the Forest with His Familiar
The Black Man of the Forest with His Familiar
Illustration from Chap-Book of the 18th Century by John Ashton (L.Chatto and Windus,1882). Witches were thought to own or associate with strange animals and evil creatures called "familiars." These are described in many of the original documents of the Salem Witchcraft Hysteria. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Detail from the Witches' Sabbat on the Brocken.  From the Douce Collection, Bodleian Library, Oxford.
Detail from the Witches' Sabbat on the Brocken. From the Douce Collection, Bodleian Library, Oxford.
The witches' sabbath or sabbat was, according to European tradition, a meeting of devil worshipers that occurred late at night and went on until dawn. The meeting could include blasphemous parodies of Christian rites (a Black Mass), licentious orgies, initiation rites for new members in a coven, or secret conspiracies against established law and order--all assisted by the Evil One, Satan or the Devil. Often depicted as orgies of gluttony and lust, sabbats were nightmarish events attended by all manner of hellish creatures and demons. The Devil often appeared as a goat or a ram, if not a mysterious “black man.”  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
\"Snow Image,\" frontispiece illustration by Frederick Church from vol 3, <I>The House of the Seven Gables and The Snow Image and Other Twice-Told Tales</I>
"Snow Image," frontispiece illustration by Frederick Church from vol 3, The House of the Seven Gables and The Snow Image and Other Twice-Told Tales
In contrast to the somber gravestone images with which Hawthorne would have been familiar, this image by Frederick Church, which served as the frontispiece illustration from volume 3 of the 1883 Riverside Press edition of The House of the Seven Gables and The Snow Image and Other Twice-Told Tales captures and innocent spirit that occasionally appears in such pieces as "The Snow Image" and "Little Annie's Ramble." Romanticized and whimsical, the drawing points us to one possible version of Hawthorne's idea of goodness. (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)
Portrait of Samuel Sewall (1652-1730) by John Smibert (1688-1751)
Portrait of Samuel Sewall (1652-1730) by John Smibert (1688-1751)
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)



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