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Excerpt from "The Birth-mark"

Excerpt from "The Birth-mark"

This passage illustrates the temptations to which intellectuals are susceptible and to which Aylmer yielded even before meeting Georgiana. Like Roger Chillingworth of The Scarlet Letter, Aylmer enters marriage with a heart already so pledged to science that there remained little room for regular human affections.
In those days, when the comparatively recent discovery of electricity, and other kindred mysteries of nature, seemed to open paths into the region of miracle, it was not unusual for the love of science to rival the love of woman, in its depth and absorbing energy. The higher intellect, the imagination, the spirit, and even the heart, might all find their congenial aliment in pursuits which, as some of their ardent votaries believed, would ascend from one step of powerful intelligence to another, until the philosopher should lay his hand on the secret of creative force, and perhaps make new worlds for himself. We know not whether Aylmer possessed this degree of faith in man's ultimate control over nature. He had devoted himself, however, too unreservedly to scientific studies, ever to be weaned from them by any second passion. His love for his young wife might prove the stronger of the two; but it could only be by intertwining itself with his love of science, and uniting the strength of the latter to its own.



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