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Original Documents Related to Short Stories and Sketches

  • Short Story Volumes
    • Twice-Told Tales
      <I/>Twice-Told Tales</I>,
      Twice-Told Tales,
      The Cover of Hawthorne's Twice-Told Tales, "Salem Edition," published in 1893 by Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
      <I/>Twice-Told Tales</I>, the \"Salem Edition,\" 1893, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge.
      Twice-Told Tales, the "Salem Edition," 1893, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge.
      Title Page of Hawthorne's Twice-Told Tales, the "Salem Edition," 1893. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
      The Custom House, Salem
      The Custom House, Salem
      From Twice-Told Tales, the "Salem Edition," 1893, Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge. (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
    • Mosses from an Old Manse
      Cover of Hawthorne's <I/>Mosses From An Old Manse</I>
      Cover of Hawthorne's Mosses From An Old Manse
      "Salem Edition," published in 1893 by Houghton, Mifflin and Company, The Riverside Press, Cambridge.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
      <I>Mosses From an Old Manse</I>
      Mosses From an Old Manse
      This elaborately illustrated title page graces the 1893 or 1894 Henry Altemus edition of Mosses From an Old Manse
      The Old Manse, illustration from frontispiece of Mosses from an Old Manse, from <I>Hawthorne's Works, vol. 2</I>
      The Old Manse, illustration from frontispiece of Mosses from an Old Manse, from Hawthorne's Works, vol. 2
      from the 1882 Riverside Press 15 volume edition of Hawthorne's works published by Houghton, Mifflin & Co. in Boston  (courtesy of Halldor F. Utne)
  • Short Stories and Sketches
    • Alice Doane’s Appeal
      Autograph of John Hathorne from Perley's <I>History of Salem</I>
      Autograph of John Hathorne from Perley's History of Salem
       (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Autograph of Jonathan Corwin from Perley's <I>History of Salem</I>
      Autograph of Jonathan Corwin from Perley's History of Salem
       (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Samuel Parris Autograph
      Samuel Parris Autograph
       (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      John Proctor Autograph
      John Proctor Autograph
      The autograph of John Proctor, executed for witchcraft August 19, 1692.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Title Page of Cotton Mather's  <I>The Wonders of the Invisible World </I>
      Title Page of Cotton Mather's The Wonders of the Invisible World
      Cotton Mather's defense of the Salem Witchcraft Trials portrayed those involved as caught in a battle between the forces of good and evil in the New World.  
      <I/>A Modest Enquiry into the Nature of Witchcraft,</I> 1697, by John Hale.
      A Modest Enquiry into the Nature of Witchcraft, 1697, by John Hale.
      Title Page of Rev. John Hale's brief history of the Salem Witchcraft trials, A Modest Enquiry into the Nature of Witchcraft, 1697. Hale was the Pastor of the Church in Beverly, Massachusetts until 1700 and an ardent supporter of the witch hunts of 1692. His opinion changed, however, when his second wife, Sarah (Noyes), was accused.  (courtesy of The Beverly Historical Society)
      Title Page, Cotton Mather's Sermon, \"Humiliations followed by Deliverences,\" published in 1697. ©The Huntington Library
      Title Page, Cotton Mather's Sermon, "Humiliations followed by Deliverences," published in 1697. ©The Huntington Library
      In this sermon, Mather gives the first account of Hannah Duston's captivity and escape from the Abenaki Indians. Mather interviewed Duston after her return to Haverhill, Massachusetts. A revised version later appeared in his Magnalia Christi Americana, 1702. (courtesy of The Huntington Library, San Marino, CA)
      Title Page, <I/>The Whole Booke of Psalms,</I>
Cambridge, 1640. ©The Huntington Library
      Title Page, The Whole Booke of Psalms, Cambridge, 1640. ©The Huntington Library
      The "Bay Psalm Book," the name generally given to The Whole Booke of Psalms, was the authorized hymnal of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and the first book printed in the English colonies. John Cotton wrote the Preface and Richard Mather, John Eliot, and Thomas Weld did the translation.  (courtesy of The Huntington Library, San Marino, CA)
      Title Page of \"The World Bewitch'd\" (London, 1695)by Balthazar Bekker, D.D. and Pastor at Amsterdam
      Title Page of "The World Bewitch'd" (London, 1695)by Balthazar Bekker, D.D. and Pastor at Amsterdam
       (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Charles Upham's <I/>Salem Witchcraft<I>
      Charles Upham's Salem Witchcraft
      Title Page from Charles Upham's Salem Witchcraft (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    • The Duston Family
      Map of Northeastern Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire.
      Map of Northeastern Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire.
      Map of Hannah Duston's escape journey on the Merrimack River, from Contoocook Island in Penacook, NH to Haverhill, MA.  (courtesy of The Story of Hannah Duston/Dustin of Haverhill, Massachusetts Website )
    • Feathertop
      Witches of Warboyse
      Witches of Warboyse
      Frontispiece to"A Complete History of Magick, Sorcery, and Witchcraft...." (London, 1715)  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Mosses From an Old Manse
      Mosses From an Old Manse
      This portrait of Old Mother Rigby from "Feathertop" serves as the frontispiece for the 1893 or 1894 edition of the Henry Altemus publication of Mosses From an Old Manse.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    • The Gentle Boy
      \"The Gentle Boy\"
      "The Gentle Boy"
      Cover of "The Gentle Boy" published in a separate volume by Weeks & Jordan in Boston and by Wiley & Putnam in New York and London in 1839 and illustrated by Sophia Peabody. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Title Page of \"The Gentle Boy\"
      Title Page of "The Gentle Boy"
      "The Gentle Boy" was published in a separate volume in 1839 by Weeks, Jordan & Co. in Boston and by Wiley & Putnam in New York and London and illustrated by Sophia Peabody. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      The Gentle Boy
      The Gentle Boy
      Dedication page of "The Gentle Boy" published in 1839 as a separate volume by Weeks & Jordan in Boston and Wiley & Putnam in New York and London and illustrated by Sophia Peabody. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Illustration by Sophia Peabody from <I>The Gentle Boy: A Thrice Told Tale</I>, 1839
      Illustration by Sophia Peabody from The Gentle Boy: A Thrice Told Tale, 1839
      This illustration of Ibrahim by Hawthorne's wife captures Ibrahim's vulnerability and gentleness. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      The Massacre of Ann Hutchinson
      The Massacre of Ann Hutchinson
      Illustration from A Popular History of the United States by William Cullen Bryant. New York, Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1896.  (courtesy of The Boston Public Library.)
      The First Quaker Meeting House
From  chapter XV entitled \"Quaker Persecution\" Sidney Perley's <I>The History of Salem Massachusetts, Vol. II, 1926</I>
      The First Quaker Meeting House From chapter XV entitled "Quaker Persecution" Sidney Perley's The History of Salem Massachusetts, Vol. II, 1926
      Drawing (pencil sketch)by James Henry Emerton, 1861 (as meeting house stood in Gallows Hill pasture as a woodshed)  (special thanks to Salem Public Library.)
    • Main Street
      The Indian Deed to Salem, 1686
      The Indian Deed to Salem, 1686
      Full view of The Indian Deed to Salem, 1686 
      Indian Names on the Salem Deed, 1686
      Indian Names on the Salem Deed, 1686
      Detail of the Indian Deed to Salem, 1686. The marks of Sam Wuttaanoh, John Tontohqunne and Cicely Petaghuncksq are shown.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      The Indian Deed to Salem, 1686
      The Indian Deed to Salem, 1686
      Back side of The Indian Deed to Salem, 1686 
      The Squaw Sachem's Mark.
      The Squaw Sachem's Mark.
      Detail of an early document showing the bow and arrow that was the Squaw Sachem's Mark. The words identifying the "signature" were written by a clerk.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Indian Signatures from Early Massachusetts Documents
      Indian Signatures from Early Massachusetts Documents
      Indian Signatures from Sidney Perley's History of Salem, Massachusetts. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

      This is William Wood's map, taken from his book, New England's Prospect, which includes one of the earliest descriptive accounts of Salem, Massachusetts, the local Indians, and the natural environment.  
      Indian Lands and Localities in Essex County Massachusetts
      Indian Lands and Localities in Essex County Massachusetts
      Map of Essex County, Massachusetts from Sidney Perley's Indian Deeds of Essex County, 1912, showing Indian place names and tribal areas.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Map of Indian Lands and Localities in Essex County Massachusetts
      Map of Indian Lands and Localities in Essex County Massachusetts
      Map of Essex County, Massachusetts from Sidney Perley's Indian Deeds of Essex County  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      The First \"Main Street\":  Site of the Old Planters Settlement at Naumkeag
      The First "Main Street": Site of the Old Planters Settlement at Naumkeag
      This map illustrates the site of the first English settlement in Naumkeag. Here Roger Conant came with his companions in the autumn of 1626.  
      Map of New England in 1640
      Map of New England in 1640
      This map of New England in 1640 shows the region's major towns and settlements.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Essex County, Massachusetts in 1643.
      Essex County, Massachusetts in 1643.
      This map illustrates the first towns or "plantations" in northeastern Massachusetts.  
      Relief Map of Salem
      Relief Map of Salem
      Relief map of Salem from Sidney Perley's The History of Salem Massachusetts (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      \"The Ancient Ways\" of Essex County
      "The Ancient Ways" of Essex County
      The old roads of the Salem area from Sidney Perley's The History of Salem Massachusetts (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Endecott Lands, Danvers (Salem Village)
      Endecott Lands, Danvers (Salem Village)
      John Endecott Lands in Danversport Area (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Indian Village (From Hariot's \"Relation\")
      Indian Village (From Hariot's "Relation")
      Illustration from A Popular History of the United States by William Cullen Bryant. New York, Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1896.  (courtesy of The Boston Public Library.)
      Roger Conant Autograph
      Roger Conant Autograph
      The Autograph of Roger Conant (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    • The Minister’s Black Veil
      Plate II, Adam and Eve, Derby Family Bible, Universal Bible, 1759 ed.
      Plate II, Adam and Eve, Derby Family Bible, Universal Bible, 1759 ed.
      Print of Adam and Eve as Their Disobedience to God in the Garden of Eden Brings Sin and Death into the World, the Original Sin Precipitating the Fall of All Humanity (courtesy of Salem Maritime National Historic Site)
      Genesis, Chapter 3, Verses 17,18, and 19 from Derby Family Bible
      Genesis, Chapter 3, Verses 17,18, and 19 from Derby Family Bible
      The scriptural passage serves as a source for the Calvinistic Doctrine of Original Sin whereby all descendants of the Original Sinners, in other words all humanity sprung from Adam and Eve, are presumed to share the defect of the parents, the inherent tendency to go against God and serve sin. The Doctrine serves as the premise for people's need to seek salvation from their evil nature by confessing their state and seeking salvation through rebirth in the Savior, Jesus Christ.  (courtesy of Salem Maritime National Historic Site)
    • The Seven Vagabonds
      Map of New England in 1640
      Map of New England in 1640
      This map of New England in 1640 shows the region's major towns and settlements.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Map of Southern New England Indian Tribes, c. 1600.
      Map of Southern New England Indian Tribes, c. 1600.
      Map of Southern New England Indian Tribes, c. 1600. 
      Indian Signatures from Early Massachusetts Documents
      Indian Signatures from Early Massachusetts Documents
      Indian Signatures from Sidney Perley's History of Salem, Massachusetts. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      The Squaw Sachem's Mark.
      The Squaw Sachem's Mark.
      Detail of an early document showing the bow and arrow that was the Squaw Sachem's Mark. The words identifying the "signature" were written by a clerk.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
    • Young Goodman Brown
      The Black Man of the Forest with His Familiar
      The Black Man of the Forest with His Familiar
      Illustration from Chap-Book of the 18th Century by John Ashton (L.Chatto and Windus,1882). Witches were thought to own or associate with strange animals and evil creatures called "familiars." These are described in many of the original documents of the Salem Witchcraft Hysteria. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Title Page of Cotton Mather's  <I>The Wonders of the Invisible World </I>
      Title Page of Cotton Mather's The Wonders of the Invisible World
      Cotton Mather's defense of the Salem Witchcraft Trials portrayed those involved as caught in a battle between the forces of good and evil in the New World.  
      Title Page, Cotton Mather's <I/>Magnalia Christi Americana</I>, 1702.  London: Printed for Thomas Parkhurst, at the Bible and three crowns in Cheapside, 1702.
      Title Page, Cotton Mather's Magnalia Christi Americana, 1702. London: Printed for Thomas Parkhurst, at the Bible and three crowns in Cheapside, 1702.
      "The Great Works of Christ in America"—Mather's history of colonial Massachussetts is a major work of early New England history through the Puritan imagination. In the General Introduction Mather states: "I WRITE the WONDERS of the CHRISTIAN RELIGION, flying from the depravations of Europe, to the American Strand; and, assisted by the Holy Author of that Religion, I do with all conscience of Truth, required therein by Him, who is the Truth itself, report the wonderful displays of His infinite Power, Wisdom, Goodness, and Faithfulness, wherewith His Divine Providenee hath irradiated an Indian Wilderness."  (courtesy of The Boston Public Library.)
      Title Page, <I/>The Whole Booke of Psalms,</I>
Cambridge, 1640. ©The Huntington Library
      Title Page, The Whole Booke of Psalms, Cambridge, 1640. ©The Huntington Library
      The "Bay Psalm Book," the name generally given to The Whole Booke of Psalms, was the authorized hymnal of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and the first book printed in the English colonies. John Cotton wrote the Preface and Richard Mather, John Eliot, and Thomas Weld did the translation.  (courtesy of The Huntington Library, San Marino, CA)
      <I/>A Modest Enquiry into the Nature of Witchcraft,</I> 1697, by John Hale.
      A Modest Enquiry into the Nature of Witchcraft, 1697, by John Hale.
      Title Page of Rev. John Hale's brief history of the Salem Witchcraft trials, A Modest Enquiry into the Nature of Witchcraft, 1697. Hale was the Pastor of the Church in Beverly, Massachusetts until 1700 and an ardent supporter of the witch hunts of 1692. His opinion changed, however, when his second wife, Sarah (Noyes), was accused.  (courtesy of The Beverly Historical Society)
      Charles Upham's <I/>Salem Witchcraft<I>
      Charles Upham's Salem Witchcraft
      Title Page from Charles Upham's Salem Witchcraft (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Arrest Warrant for Alice Parker and Ann Pudeator
      Arrest Warrant for Alice Parker and Ann Pudeator
      Arrest Warrant for Alice Parker and Ann Pudeator, Peabody Essex Museum Photo (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Death Warrant and Execution of Bridget Bishop, Peabody Essex Museum Photo
      Death Warrant and Execution of Bridget Bishop, Peabody Essex Museum Photo
      Death Warrant and Execution of Bridget Bishop, Peabody Essex Museum Photo (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Witches with their Familiar Flying on Broomsticks.
      Witches with their Familiar Flying on Broomsticks.
      In the British Islands, it was believed that the Devil gave his witches a faithful demonic creature, often in the shape of a small animal (a black cat, dog, or toad, for example) that would advise the witch and assist in her evil doings. Also known as "imps" or "familiar spirits," these malicious creatures were different from the Devil himself, who often took the shape of a beast or a human, in European and early American traditions of witchcraft. It was thought that the witch's familiar would suck her blood for nourishment.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Map of Salem Village by Sidney Perley
      Map of Salem Village by Sidney Perley
      Map from Sidney Perley's The History of Salem Massachusetts, Vol. 2, (1924). The map shows the "Salem Farms" area that is known as the Town of Danvers today. It was here that the witchcraft hysteria of 1692 actually began.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Map of Salem Village in 1692 by W.P. Upham, 1866.
      Map of Salem Village in 1692 by W.P. Upham, 1866.
      From Charles W. Upham’s Salem Witchcraft (1867)  (courtesy of the University of Virginia.)
      Perley's Map of Gallows Hill and Area
      Perley's Map of Gallows Hill and Area
      Perley's Map of Gallows Hill and Area (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Map of Salem Village by Sidney Perley
      Map of Salem Village by Sidney Perley
      Map from Sidney Perley's The History of Salem Massachusetts, Vol. 2, (1924). The map shows the "Salem Farms" area that is known as the Town of Danvers today. It was here that the witchcraft hysteria of 1692 actually began.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Autograph of John Hathorne from Perley's <I>History of Salem</I>
      Autograph of John Hathorne from Perley's History of Salem
       (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Autograph of Jonathan Corwin from Perley's <I>History of Salem</I>
      Autograph of Jonathan Corwin from Perley's History of Salem
       (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Samuel Parris Autograph
      Samuel Parris Autograph
       (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
      Document from Salem Witch Trials signed by John Hathorne and Jonathan Corwin
      Document from Salem Witch Trials signed by John Hathorne and Jonathan Corwin
       (courtesy of The House of the Seven Gables Historic Site)




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