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Images Related to The Maternal Ancestors of Nathaniel Hawthorne

Images Related to The Maternal Ancestors of Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Manning Family
The Manning House on Herbert St.
The Manning House on Dearborn St.
The Hathorne House on Dearborn St.
Churches Attended by Betsey Clarke Manning and Other Members of the Manning Family and Ministers of those Churches
Raymond, Maine
Objects Owned by the Mannings
Buildings in Salem related to the Mannings

The Manning Family

Robert Manning, Hawthorne's maternal uncle
Robert Manning, Hawthorne's maternal uncle
Miniature on ivory in decorative arts collection of the Peabody Essex Museum (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Howard St. Cemetery, 29 Howard St., next to former Salem Jail
Howard St. Cemetery, 29 Howard St., next to former Salem Jail
This cemetery opened in 1801. Some of Hawthorne's Manning relatives are buried here. (photography by Lou Procopio)
View of gravestones in Howard St. Cemetery, 29 Howard St., next to former Salem Jail
View of gravestones in Howard St. Cemetery, 29 Howard St., next to former Salem Jail
This cemetery opened in 1801. Some of Hawthorne's Manning relatives are buried here (photography by Lou Procopio)
Obituary for Rebecca Manning, cousin of Nathaniel Hawthorne and last surviving child of Robert Manning
Obituary for Rebecca Manning, cousin of Nathaniel Hawthorne and last surviving child of Robert Manning
Obituary in the Salem Evening News in August, 1933 for Rebecca Manning, daughter of Hawthorne's uncle, Robert Manning, who was the last Manning to reside at 33 Dearborn Street. NOTE: The article incorrectly gives the date that Robert Manning and his wife moved to 33 Dearborn St. as 1825; the correct date is 1824. Also, the article states that Robert Manning and his wife had four children when, in fact, they had three. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Rebecca Manning in doorway of her house at 33 Dearborn St. in Salem
Rebecca Manning in doorway of her house at 33 Dearborn St. in Salem
 

The Manning House on Herbert St.

10 1/2 (also called 12) Herbert St. in Salem
10 1/2 (also called 12) Herbert St. in Salem
In Hawthorne's time, this may have been 12 Herbert St.; there is no 12 Herbert St. today. In Salem directories, the house is usually listed as 10 Herbert St. As parts of the house were at times rented, this may have resulted in the altered house numbers. Hawthorne moved into this house with his widowed mother and two sisters during the spring of 1808. In his journals he refers to this house as "Castle Dismal." When the Hathornes moved in, the house was owned and occupied by Hawthorne's mother's parents, the Mannings, and their eight children. The house was crowded, and Margaret Moore and others refer to Nathaniel sleeping in the same bed with his uncle Robert (aged 24 when Nathaniel was 4), but in her book The Salem World of Nathaniel Hawthorne, Margaret Moore explains that beds were in short supply in large families in early nineteenth century New England (60).  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

The Manning House on Dearborn St.

33 Dearborn St., Salem; home of Robert Manning, Hawthorne's uncle
33 Dearborn St., Salem; home of Robert Manning, Hawthorne's uncle
The fence and attached barn are no longer on the property. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Robert Manning House on Dearborn St. in Salem
Robert Manning House on Dearborn St. in Salem
The house still stands today but without the fence. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Garden of Robert Manning House on Dearborn St. in Salem, MA
Garden of Robert Manning House on Dearborn St. in Salem, MA
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Cover of <I>Old Salem Gardens</I> which contains a description of the famous pomological garden of Robert Manning.
Cover of Old Salem Gardens which contains a description of the famous pomological garden of Robert Manning.
 (special thanks to Loretta and Roger Rainville)
Gardens of Robert Manning House on Dearborn St. in Salem
Gardens of Robert Manning House on Dearborn St. in Salem
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Fern Garden of Robert Manning house on Deaborn St. in Salem
Fern Garden of Robert Manning house on Deaborn St. in Salem
Hawthorne lived for four years (1828-1832)with his mother and sisters next door to the Manning House on Dearborn St. The Hawthorne cottage has since been moved across and down the street. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Side view of 33 Dearborn St. in Salem
Side view of 33 Dearborn St. in Salem
 
The Robert Manning House at 33 Dearborn St. in Salem
The Robert Manning House at 33 Dearborn St. in Salem
 
Photograph from the 1930s of Rebecca Manning in the doorway of her house at 33 Dearborn St. in Salem
Photograph from the 1930s of Rebecca Manning in the doorway of her house at 33 Dearborn St. in Salem
 
An 1850s stereopticon image of a woman with baby pram on Dearborn St. with the Manning house at 33 Dearborn in the background
An 1850s stereopticon image of a woman with baby pram on Dearborn St. with the Manning house at 33 Dearborn in the background
 
Rebecca Manning in doorway of her house at 33 Dearborn St. in Salem
Rebecca Manning in doorway of her house at 33 Dearborn St. in Salem
 
33 Dearborn St. today; Robert Manning, Hawthorne's uncle, resided in this house and Hawthorne and his mother lived from 1828-1832 in a cottage next door.
33 Dearborn St. today; Robert Manning, Hawthorne's uncle, resided in this house and Hawthorne and his mother lived from 1828-1832 in a cottage next door.
 
Front door of 33 Dearborn St. in Salem
Front door of 33 Dearborn St. in Salem
 
Stereopticon card of woman with pram on Dearborn ST. in the 1850s with 33 Dearborn St. in the background
Stereopticon card of woman with pram on Dearborn ST. in the 1850s with 33 Dearborn St. in the background
 

The Hathorne House on Dearborn St.

Cottage at 26 Dearborn St. built in 1828 by Robert Manning for his sister, Elizabeth Hathorne, and her children.
Cottage at 26 Dearborn St. built in 1828 by Robert Manning for his sister, Elizabeth Hathorne, and her children.
Robert Manning, built this Dutch style house with a gambrel roof and flared eaves, for his sister, Nathaniel’s mother, and her children in 1828. It was located next door to the Manning House on the site of the former Frank E. Locke house when Hawthorne lived there with his mother and sisters from 1828 to 1832. It was moved across the street in 1851 or 1852 by George Brown, the owner of the house at that time. The original ell from the house is still standing, however, and is part of the house now located at 31 Dearborn St. 
Manning Cottage at 26 Dearborn St., Salem
Manning Cottage at 26 Dearborn St., Salem
Robert Manning, built this Dutch style house with a gambrel roof and flared eaves, for his sister, Nathaniel’s mother, and her children in 1828. It was located next door to the Manning House on the site of the former Frank E. Locke house when Hawthorne lived there with his mother and sisters from 1828 to 1832. It was moved across the street in 1851 or 1852 by George Brown, the owner of the house at that time. The original ell from the house is still standing, however, and is part of the house now located at 31 Dearborn St.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

Churches Attended by Betsey Clarke Manning and Other Members of the Manning Family and Ministers of those Churches

Salem Witch Museum (built for East Church in 1844-46; home of the Witch Museum since 1972), 19 ½ Washington Square North at Brown St. (built in 1844-46)
Salem Witch Museum (built for East Church in 1844-46; home of the Witch Museum since 1972), 19 ½ Washington Square North at Brown St. (built in 1844-46)
The East Church, organized in 1718, was the oldest branch of the First Church of Salem. Hawthorne’s Manning grandparents attended East Church, a liberal Unitarian congregation led by Dr. William Bentley from 1783-1819. Hawthorne’s mother, Elizabeth Clarke Manning, also attended East Church as a young girl when Dr. Bentley was pastor. She joined First Church in 1806, however, and had her children baptized there. According to Gilbert L. Streeter in “Salem Before the Revolution,” EIHC, 32 (1896), the East Church meeting-house was located near the corner of Essex and Hardy streets (87). The building was demolished in 1845, however, and a new church was built at 19 ½ Washington Square North at Brown St between 1844 and 1846. This Gothic Revival building today houses the Salem Witch Museum. (courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum; special thanks to Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.)
Portrait of Rev. William Bentley (1759-1819) of Salem by Frothingham
Portrait of Rev. William Bentley (1759-1819) of Salem by Frothingham
Educated at Harvard, William Bentley was the minister at the East Church (Second Congregational} in Salem from 1783 until his death in 1819. His personal diary offers a thorough treatment of life in Salem during its golden era of East India Trade.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
First Church (Daniel Low Building), 121 Washington St., 231 Essex St. Mall
First Church (Daniel Low Building), 121 Washington St., 231 Essex St. Mall
First Church, established in 1629, was the first Protestant church in America. Rebecca Nurse and Giles Cory, two victims of the witchcraft hysteria in 1692, were members, and most of the Hathorne family also belonged to this church. Nathaniel's grandfather and grandmother were members; Hawthorne's mother, Elizabeth Clarke Manning Hathorne, joined First Church in 1806, and her children were baptized there. In the early 1800s, the church became Unitarian in its theology. In 1824, Charles W. Upham became associate pastor with John Prince, and after Prince's death in 1836, became pastor. He remained in this position until 1844 when he left the post because of illness. Margaret Moore points out in The Salem World of Nathaniel Hawthorne that "Hawthorne wrote in Our Old Home that only fond memories of John Prince of First Church helped him retain 'a devout, though not intact nor unwavering respect for the entire fraternity of ministers'(CE 5:28)." (110). First Church was originally located in Town House Square, but in 1734, after a dispute between the minister, John Fisk, and some members of his congregation, Fisk and his supporters built a new First Church at 256 Essex St., a short distance from their original location. In 1772, the church broke into five different churches and rejoined in later years. This building was constructed in 1826; the second floor was used by First Church and the first floor was rented to shopkeepers. In 1874, the church was enlarged and extensively remodeled in the High Victorian Gothic style. In 1922, the First Church merged with North Church (Unitarian) and moved to the North Church building at 256 Essex St. Daniel Low and Company then acquired the property at 121 Washington St. (courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum; special thanks to Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.)
Daniel Lowe Building, formerly First Church, 231 Essex St. Mall
Daniel Lowe Building, formerly First Church, 231 Essex St. Mall
First Church, established in 1629, was the first Protestant church in America. Rebecca Nurse and Giles Cory, two victims of the witchcraft hysteria in 1692, were members, and most of the Hathorne family also belonged to this church. Nathaniel's grandfather and grandmother were members; Hawthorne's mother, Elizabeth Clarke Manning Hathorne, joined First Church in 1806, and her children were baptized there. In the early 1800s, the church became Unitarian in its theology. In 1824, Charles W. Upham became associate pastor with John Prince, and after Prince's death in 1836, became pastor. He remained in this position until 1844 when he left the post because of illness. Margaret Moore points out in The Salem World of Nathaniel Hawthorne that "Hawthorne wrote in Our Old Home that only fond memories of John Prince of First Church helped him retain 'a devout, though not intact nor unwavering respect for the entire fraternity of ministers'(CE 5:28)." (110). First Church was originally located in Town House Square, but in 1734, after a dispute between the minister, John Fisk, and some members of his congregation, Fisk and his supporters built a new First Church at 256 Essex St., a short distance from their original location. In 1772, the church broke into five different churches and rejoined in later years. This building was constructed in 1826; the second floor was used by First Church and the first floor was rented to shopkeepers. In 1874, the church was enlarged and extensively remodeled in the High Victorian Gothic style. In 1922, the First Church merged with North Church (Unitarian) and moved to the North Church building at 256 Essex St. Daniel Low and Company then acquired the property at 121 Washington St. (photography by Lou Procopio)
Tabernacle Church, Washington and Federal Sts., Salem
Tabernacle Church, Washington and Federal Sts., Salem
Established in 1735 as a branch of the First Church, and calling itself "The First Church of Salem," Tabernacle Church built a meeting house in 1736 near 256 Essex St. Until 1762, Salem thus had two churches calling themselves, First Church. At that time, the government required the church that separated to change its name, so it became Third Church of Christ in Salem. When that house of worship was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1774, a new building was erected in 1777 that resembled London's Tabernacle, and soon was referred to as The Tabernacle. Eventually the church took this as its legal name. One of the most orthodox congregations in Hawthorne's time, it was led by Dr. Samuel Worcester (1770-1821), who was installed as minister in 1803 and who was one of the leading voices of the conservative view in New England. His sermons were highly regarded; Leverett Saltonstall, a leading Unitarian lawyer in Salem, admired them because of their mixture of emotion and reason, even though he was aware that Worcester was a strict calvinist. In 1924 the Tabernacle Church merged with South Church, and the current Colonial Revival building was constructed, replacing a large wooden Italian Revival building which was the home of the Tabernacle Church from 1854 until it was demolished in 1922. From 1776 to 1854, the building that stood on this ground was occupied by the Tabernacle Church and in 1805 featured a three-stage tower added by Samuel McIntire. This is the building that Hawthorne would have known. (courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum; special thanks to Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.)

Raymond, Maine

The approach to Raymond, Maine
The approach to Raymond, Maine
 (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
Dingley Brook in Raymond, Maine, looking upstream from the old dam structure
Dingley Brook in Raymond, Maine, looking upstream from the old dam structure
 (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
Dingley Brook in Raymond, Maine, rushing downstream
Dingley Brook in Raymond, Maine, rushing downstream
 (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
The Mouth of Dingley Brook with the Dingley Islands in the Distance
The Mouth of Dingley Brook with the Dingley Islands in the Distance
 (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
The shoreline of Sebago Lake near Raymond, Maine
The shoreline of Sebago Lake near Raymond, Maine
 (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
Sebago Lake near Raymond, Maine
Sebago Lake near Raymond, Maine
 (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
The family graveyard in Raymond, Maine
The family graveyard in Raymond, Maine
 (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
Pulpit Rock in Raymond, Maine
Pulpit Rock in Raymond, Maine
 (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
Dingley Brook in Raymond, Maine
Dingley Brook in Raymond, Maine
 (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
Oil painting dated in the 1840s of the Manning House, now in South Casco, built about 1810 in Raymondtown, MA
Oil painting dated in the 1840s of the Manning House, now in South Casco, built about 1810 in Raymondtown, MA
The painting, done in the 1840s, indicates that there were few changes in the building over time. The house was built by Richard Manning who was the local agent for the Raymondtown Proprietors and was referred to as "'Manning's Folly' for its pretentions to grandeur in those times" (20). Raymondtown was in Massachusetts in 1810, but in 1820 Maine separated from Massachusetts and Casco separated from Raymond town in 1841.  (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
The entrance hall of the Richard Manning house in Raymond, Maine
The entrance hall of the Richard Manning house in Raymond, Maine
 (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
Indian shutters open, having slid into the casement; at the Richard Manning house in Raymond, Maine
Indian shutters open, having slid into the casement; at the Richard Manning house in Raymond, Maine
 (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
Detail of the parlor chair-rail of the Richard Manning house in Raymond, Maine
Detail of the parlor chair-rail of the Richard Manning house in Raymond, Maine
 (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
The kitchen fireplace at the Richard Manning house in Raymond, Maine, with its beehive oven on left
The kitchen fireplace at the Richard Manning house in Raymond, Maine, with its beehive oven on left
 (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
The front hallway of the Richard Manning house in Raymond, Maine, looking toward the front door, a \"Christian\" door
The front hallway of the Richard Manning house in Raymond, Maine, looking toward the front door, a "Christian" door
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Front stairway with scrollwork pattern in Richard Manning house in Raymond, Maine
Front stairway with scrollwork pattern in Richard Manning house in Raymond, Maine
 (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
The Southwest Bedroom of the Richard Manning House in Raymond, Maine
The Southwest Bedroom of the Richard Manning House in Raymond, Maine
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Lake Sebago, near Raymond, Maine, in March, still frozen; photographed in 1981
Lake Sebago, near Raymond, Maine, in March, still frozen; photographed in 1981
 (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
The Mouth of Dingley Brook with the Dingley Islands in the Distance
The Mouth of Dingley Brook with the Dingley Islands in the Distance
 (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
The Icy Expanse of Lake Sebago, Maine
The Icy Expanse of Lake Sebago, Maine
 (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
Crutches in Raymond, Maine house which possibly belonged to Hawthorne
Crutches in Raymond, Maine house which possibly belonged to Hawthorne
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Hawthorne House in Raymond, Maine
Hawthorne House in Raymond, Maine
The Hawthorne House in South Casco, Maine, built by Richard Manning for his sister, Nathaniel Hawthorne's mother. This photograph shows the house in a state of disrepair, before it was restored by the Hawthorne Association. (courtesy of Raymond Woman's Club,Cardinal Publishing.)
The Hawthorne house in Raymond, Maine, photographed in 1981
The Hawthorne house in Raymond, Maine, photographed in 1981
According to Melinda M. Ponder in her 1981 paper "Nathaniel Hawthorne: The Morning of His Life," in June of 1816 “Robert [Manning] began the construction of a large house in Raymond so that all of the Mannings could eventually move from economically depressed Salem to their lands in Maine.” She also says that “[w]hile the Hawthorne’s visited Salem during the summer of 1818, construction on their new house continued in Raymond, under uncle Robert’s direction.” The house, which cost $2407.10, was built “on a knoll opposite the Manning house overlooking Dingley Brook.” The house was purchased by the Hawthorne Association in 1922; they remain the caretakers and schedule cultural events in the home. (courtesy of Dr. Melinda Ponder)
Restored Hawthorne House at South Casco, built by Richard Manning for his sister, Nathaniel Hawthorne's mother
Restored Hawthorne House at South Casco, built by Richard Manning for his sister, Nathaniel Hawthorne's mother
Before being taken over and restored by the Hawthorne Association, the house was the Radoux Meeting House. Francis Radoux, who married Richard Manning's widow, made the house a community meeting place to satisfy a provision in Manning's will which left money for this purpose. (courtesy of Raymond Woman's Club,Cardinal Publishing.)
Oil painting dated in the 1840s of the Manning House, now in South Casco, built about 1810 in Raymondtown, MA
Oil painting dated in the 1840s of the Manning House, now in South Casco, built about 1810 in Raymondtown, MA
The painting, done in the 1840s, indicates that there were few changes in the building over time. The house was built by Richard Manning who was the local agent for the Raymondtown Proprietors and was referred to as "'Manning's Folly' for its pretentions to grandeur in those times" (20). Raymondtown was in Massachusetts in 1810, but in 1820 Maine separated from Massachusetts and Casco separated from Raymond town in 1841. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
View of the Manning House, now in South Casco, built about 1810 in what was then Raymondtown, MA, but which became Casco, Maine, when Maine separated from Massachusetts in 1820 and Casco separated from Raymond town in 1841.
View of the Manning House, now in South Casco, built about 1810 in what was then Raymondtown, MA, but which became Casco, Maine, when Maine separated from Massachusetts in 1820 and Casco separated from Raymond town in 1841.
Richard Manning was local agent from the Raymond town Proprietors and was also the town blacksmith. According to Knight, in Manning's work as local agent and "through the acquisition of lands of proprietors in arrears on their assessments [Manning] owned a high percentage of the land of the town" (20). Knight notes that "the division line between Raymond and Casco is the Dingley Brook to the left of the house" (20). (courtesy of Raymond Woman's Club,Cardinal Publishing.)
Early picture of the Baptist Church on Raymond Hill, one of the first two churches in Raymondtown
Early picture of the Baptist Church on Raymond Hill, one of the first two churches in Raymondtown
The addition to the building in the rear was, according to Knight, "supposed to have been the building of the first church, which is very likely so, as it is of older origin and would not have been an added structure in this location and form" (173). Knight also notes that "the land for the Hill church was deeded by Richard Manning, agent for the Proprietors, on 23 March, 1803," and he points out that "the cemetery contains the graves of early settlers of Raymond"(173). (courtesy of Raymond Woman's Club,Cardinal Publishing.)
Building erected in the 1830s on Raymond Hill to house the Baptist Church
Building erected in the 1830s on Raymond Hill to house the Baptist Church
The land for this church was deeded by Richard Manning in his position as agent from the Proprietors on 23 March, 1803, but the building shown here was not erected until the 1830s. According to Knight, "the sanctuary of this church has an interesting curved ceiling and the cemetery contains the graves of early settlers of Raymond" (173). (courtesy of Raymond Woman's Club,Cardinal Publishing.)

Objects Owned by the Mannings

Manning China
Manning China
China plate from the Mannings, handed down through Robert Manning, Hawthorne's uncle; now owned by Loretta and Roger Rainville of Salem, residents of the house owned by Robert Manning on Dearborn St. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Two English Staffordshire dinner plates, from the Manning china collection
Two English Staffordshire dinner plates, from the Manning china collection
"Sheltered Peasant" pattern,underglaze blue with stencil,c. 1820, (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Close-up of two English Staffordshire dinner plates,from the Manning china collection
Close-up of two English Staffordshire dinner plates,from the Manning china collection
"Sheltered Peasant" pattern,underglaze blue with stencil,c. 1820 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Objects owned by the Manning family
Objects owned by the Manning family
Canton gravy tureen and sweetmeat dish c. 1850; Chinese pieces (Miss Rebecca Manning's mourning set: tea bowl, plate, and coffee cup); sherry glass, Bohemia, c. 1800-1810,; ale can with eagle and 15 stars hand-blown in Prague c. 1800-1810 (exported in quantity to America at this time) (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Canton gravy tureen and sweetmeat dish owned by Rebecca Manning
Canton gravy tureen and sweetmeat dish owned by Rebecca Manning
 
Rebecca Manning's mourning set: tea bowl, plate, and coffee cup
Rebecca Manning's mourning set: tea bowl, plate, and coffee cup
 
Sherry glass made in Bohemia c. 1800-1810, owned by Miss Rebecca Manning, daughter of Robert Manning
Sherry glass made in Bohemia c. 1800-1810, owned by Miss Rebecca Manning, daughter of Robert Manning
 
Ale can with eagle and 15 stars, white glass hand-blown in Prague c. 1800-1810; owned by Miss Rebecca Manning, daughter of Robert Manning
Ale can with eagle and 15 stars, white glass hand-blown in Prague c. 1800-1810; owned by Miss Rebecca Manning, daughter of Robert Manning
Ale cans such as this one were exported in quantity to America during the early nineteenth century. 
Lantern
Lantern
 
Seed box with initials \"R.M.\" for Robert Manning, c. 1820-1840
Seed box with initials "R.M." for Robert Manning, c. 1820-1840
Robert Manning (1784-1842) was a famous pomologist whose garden extended from his Dearborn St. property for three acres.He wrote several books on fruits, and he received recognition for his contribution to pomological science from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. 
View of open seed box with initials \"R.M.\" for Robert Manning, c. 1820-1840
View of open seed box with initials "R.M." for Robert Manning, c. 1820-1840
Robert Manning (1784-1842) was a famous pomologist whose garden extended from his Dearborn St. property for three acres.He wrote several books on fruits, and he received recognition for his contribution to pomological science from the Massachusetts Horticultural Society. 
Nineteenth century garden line stake used by Robert Manning, Jr. (1827-1902) who carried on the horticultural work of his father, Robert Manning, Sr. (1784-1842)
Nineteenth century garden line stake used by Robert Manning, Jr. (1827-1902) who carried on the horticultural work of his father, Robert Manning, Sr. (1784-1842)
 

Objects Buildings in Salem related to the Mannings

Salem Athenaeum, 337 Essex St. in Salem, in 2000
In
Salem Athenaeum, 337 Essex St. in Salem, in 2000 In
The Salem Athenaeum began as part of the Social Library on Market Street, now known as Central Street, in Salem. It opened on July 11, 1810, but moved three times to various sites in Salem over the next forty years. In 1845, however, a bequest from Caroline Plummer enabled the Athenaeum to erect a building, the original Plummer Hall, at 134 Essex Street. The Athenaeum shared this building with the Essex Institute until 1905, when Plummer Hall was sold to the Essex Institute (now the Peabody Essex Museum), and with the proceeds constructed the building it currently occupies at 337 Essex St.

By 1837 the Salem Athenaeum housed 8,000 volumes. According to Hawthorne scholar Margaret Moore in her book The Salem World of Nathaniel Hawthorne, it was the "pooled holdings of the Philosophical and Social Libraries, which merged in 1810," six years after Hawthorne's birth (158). The Athenaeum supplied Hawthorne with a tremendous amount of reading material during his Salem years.

William Manning (1779-1864), Hawthorne's maternal uncle, owned a share in the Salem Athenaeum from 1820-1827. Mary Manning (1777-1841) also was a member from 1826; she later gave this share to Hawthorne. Today this same share is owned by David Gavenda of the National Park Service. (photography by Terri Whitney)

Salem Athenaeum, 337 Essex St. in Salem; photo from <I>Architecture in Salem</I> by Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.
Salem Athenaeum, 337 Essex St. in Salem; photo from Architecture in Salem by Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.
The Salem Athenaeum began as part of the Social Library on Market Street, now known as Central Street, in Salem. It opened on July 11, 1810, but moved three times to various sites in Salem over the next forty years. In 1845, however, a bequest from Caroline Plummer enabled the Athenaeum to erect a building, the original Plummer Hall, at 134 Essex Street. The Athenaeum shared this building with the Essex Institute until 1905, when Plummer Hall was sold to the Essex Institute (now the Peabody Essex Museum), and with the proceeds constructed the building it currently occupies at 337 Essex St.

By 1837 the Salem Athenaeum housed 8,000 volumes. According to Hawthorne scholar Margaret Moore in her book The Salem World of Nathaniel Hawthorne, it was the "pooled holdings of the Philosophical and Social Libraries, which merged in 1810," six years after Hawthorne's birth (158). The Athenaeum supplied Hawthorne with a tremendous amount of reading material during his Salem years.

William Manning (1779-1864), Hawthorne's maternal uncle, owned a share in the Salem Athenaeum from 1820-1827. Mary Manning (1777-1841) also was a member from 1826; she later gave this share to Hawthorne. Today this same share is owned by David Gavenda of the National Park Service. (courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum; special thanks to Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.)

Corner of Front and Washington St. where the Salem Athenaeum was located in the 1840s
Corner of Front and Washington St. where the Salem Athenaeum was located in the 1840s
The Salem Athenaeum began as part of the Social Library on Market Street, now known as Central Street, in Salem. It opened on July 11, 1810, but moved three times to various sites in Salem over the next forty years, including this site at the corner of Front and Washington St. In 1845, however, a bequest from Caroline Plummer enabled the Athenaeum to erect a building, the original Plummer Hall, at 134 Essex Street. The Athenaeum shared this building with the Essex Institute until 1905, when Plummer Hall was sold to the Essex Institute (now the Peabody Essex Museum), and with the proceeds constructed the building it currently occupies at 337 Essex St. (courtesy of David Gavenda, NPS)



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