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Images of Other Houses in Salem

Images of Other Houses in Salem

Some of the images are contemporary photographs taken by various photographers working on the Hawthorne project. Many photographs are by Dr. Bryant F. Tolles, Jr., Director of Museum Studies, University of Delaware, and author of Architecture in Salem (Salem: Essex Institute, 1983. We are very grateful to Dr. Tolles and to the Peabody Essex Museum, where the collection of photographs is housed, for allowing us to use these images on our Website. Other images are turn-of-the-century postcards or drawings; some are from the Peabody Essex Museum or Salem Maritime National Historic Site, and others are from private collections.
Seventeenth Century Houses Eighteenth Century Houses Nineteenth Century Houses

Seventeenth Century Houses

Postcard from 1905 of The Pickering House in Salem, MA, built in 1660
Postcard from 1905 of The Pickering House in Salem, MA, built in 1660
Built around 1651, this is Salem's oldest building and was continuously occupied by the Pickering family from 1651 until the late 20th century. The wooden structure was intially built with two rooms in two stories, but later was expanded to double this size, and changes were made in the mid-nineteenth century which reflect the Gothic Revival Style such as the Gothic cut-out fence with finial-capped posts which was constructed in 1841. On July 4, 1804, the day of Hawthorne's birth, John Pickering, the son of Timothy Pickering, gave the Independence Day oration at St. Peter's Church. (special thanks to Margaret B. Moore)
Pickering House, 18 Broad St. at Pickering St.
Pickering House, 18 Broad St. at Pickering St.
Built around 1651, this is Salem's oldest building and was continuously occupied by the Pickering family from 1651 until the late 20th century. The wooden structure was intially built with two rooms in two stories, but later was expanded to double this size, and changes were made in the mid-nineteenth century which reflect the Gothic Revival Style such as the Gothic cut-out fence with finial-capped posts which was constructed in 1841. On July 4, 1804, the day of Hawthorne's birth, John Pickering, the son of Timothy Pickering, gave the Independence Day oration at St. Peter's Church. (courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum; special thanks to Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.)
Retire Becket House on the property of The House of the Seven Gables in Salem
Retire Becket House on the property of The House of the Seven Gables in Salem
In 1916 Caroline O. Emmerton, founder of the House of the Seven Gables Settlement Association, purchased this house, and in 1924 it was moved to its present site. Currently it houses the gift shop of the House of the Seven Gables Historic Site. The building that stands today is only half of the house owned by Retire Becket as one of the Becket sisters who inherited the house after her brother, Retire, died, sold her share to the Eastern Marine Railway Company who demolished it. An archway and leanto were added by Ms. Emmerton. (courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum; special thanks to Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.)
The Peabody House,aka the Grimshawe house, 53 Charter St., next to The Burying Point in Salem.
The Peabody House,aka the Grimshawe house, 53 Charter St., next to The Burying Point in Salem.
Dr. Nathaniel Peabody and his wife, Elizabeth Palmer Peabody, moved here with their daughters in 1835. It was here in 1837 that Hawthorne met Sophia Peabody, who would become his wife. In 1840 the Peabodys moved to Boston.  (photography by Bruce Hibbard)
Postcard, probably c. 1900, of the Jonathan Corwin House, called the \"Old Witch House,\" 310 1/2 Essex St. at North St. in Salem, MA
Postcard, probably c. 1900, of the Jonathan Corwin House, called the "Old Witch House," 310 1/2 Essex St. at North St. in Salem, MA
Jonathan Corwin, a Salem merchant, purchased the house from Nathaniel Davenport of Boston in 1675. Davenport had never finished the construction of the house, so Corwin had the work completed. Corwin was living here in 1692 when he and John Hathorne served as the magistrates of Salem Town, issuing warrants for the arrest of those accused of witchcraft, and on the Court of Oyer and Terminer that sentenced accused witches to death. There is a tradition that some of the accused "witches" of the Salem hysteria were examined in the lower front room on the right, and today the house is know as the "Witch House." The house was unfinished when Corwin purchased it, but when completed, it had a central chimney plan, projecting two-story front central porch, peaked gables, and a rear lean-to. Around 1746 Sarah Corwin, the widow of Jonathan Corwin's grandson, George, enlarged and remodeled the house in the Georgian Colonial style. The house was further altered between 1856 and 1885 when George P. Farrington, the owner, added a drugstore to the front. In 1945 Historic Salem purchased the property, saving it from being demolished, and had it restored. (special thanks to Margaret B. Moore)
Jonathan Corwin House, 310 1/2 Essex St. at North St.
Jonathan Corwin House, 310 1/2 Essex St. at North St.
Jonathan Corwin, a Salem merchant, purchased the house from Nathaniel Davenport of Boston in 1675. Davenport had never finished the construction of the house, so Corwin had the work completed. Corwin was living here in 1692 when he and John Hathorne served as the magistrates of Salem Town, issuing warrants for the arrest of those accused of witchcraft, and on the Court of Oyer and Terminer that sentenced accused witches to death. There is a tradition that some of the accused "witches" of the Salem hysteria were examined in the lower front room on the right, and today the house is know as the "Witch House." The house was unfinished when Corwin purchased it, but when completed, it had a central chimney plan, projecting two-story front central porch, peaked gables, and a rear lean-to. Around 1746 Sarah Corwin, the widow of Jonathan Corwin's grandson, George, enlarged and remodeled the house in the Georgian Colonial style. The house was further altered between 1856 and 1885 when George P. Farrington, the owner, added a drugstore to the front. In 1945 Historic Salem purchased the property, saving it from being demolished, and had it restored. (courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum; special thanks to Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.)
Jonathan Corwin House (The Witch House, 310 1/2 Essex Street at North Street
Jonathan Corwin House (The Witch House, 310 1/2 Essex Street at North Street
Jonathan Corwin, a Salem merchant, purchased the house from Nathaniel Davenport of Boston in 1675. Davenport had never finished the construction of the house, so Corwin had the work completed. Corwin was living here in 1692 when he and John Hathorne served as the magistrates of Salem Town, issuing warrants for the arrest of those accused of witchcraft, and on the Court of Oyer and Terminer that sentenced accused witches to death. There is a tradition that some of the accused "witches" of the Salem hysteria were examined in the lower front room on the right, and today the house is know as the "Witch House." The house was unfinished when Corwin purchased it, but when completed, it had a central chimney plan, projecting two-story front central porch, peaked gables, and a rear lean-to. Around 1746 Sarah Corwin, the widow of Jonathan Corwin's grandson, George, enlarged and remodeled the house in the Georgian Colonial style. The house was further altered between 1856 and 1885 when George P. Farrington, the owner, added a drugstore to the front. In 1945 Historic Salem purchased the property, saving it from being demolished, and had it restored.  (photography by Bruce Hibbard)
Samuel Pickman House, 20 Liberty at Charter St.
Samuel Pickman House, 20 Liberty at Charter St.
 
Hooper-Hathaway House, Grounds of the House of the Seven Gables Historic Site, 54 Turner St.
(special thanks to Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.)
Hooper-Hathaway House, Grounds of the House of the Seven Gables Historic Site, 54 Turner St. (special thanks to Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.)
Originally at 23 Washington St., this 17th century house was built for Benjamin Hooper as a single room and expanded in 1784. The Hooper family sold the property in 1795, and the property was sold again c. 1864 to the Hathaways who used it for their bakery business. Caroline O. Emmerton purchased the house in 1911 to save it from being razed and moved it to its current location on the grounds of the House of the Seven Gables. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
The Old John Ward House
The Old John Ward House
Postcard c. 1900 of the Old John Ward House, 38 St. Peter St. in Salem, built in 1684 by John Ward. It has a projecting second story and a lean-to roof. 
Roses in bloom in front of John Ward House that are typical of what would have appeared in front of buildings in Hester Prynne's time.
The John Ward House is located on Brown St. opposite Howard, (originally at 38 St. Peter St.) and was built after 1684.
Roses in bloom in front of John Ward House that are typical of what would have appeared in front of buildings in Hester Prynne's time. The John Ward House is located on Brown St. opposite Howard, (originally at 38 St. Peter St.) and was built after 1684.
In December 1684 John Ward, a currier, purchased the land at 38 St. Peter St. and had a one-room-plan house with steep-pitched roof and overhang constructed. After his death in 1732, the house was enlarged. In 1910 the Essex Institute purchased the house, restored it, and moved it to its present location on Brown St. The house is open to visitors and offers a glimpse into life in 17th-century New England.  
John Ward House, Brown St. opposite Howard, (originally at 38 St. Peter St.) built after 1684
John Ward House, Brown St. opposite Howard, (originally at 38 St. Peter St.) built after 1684
This is one of the best examples of 17th century wood-frame-and-and clapboard houses in New England. In December 1684 John Ward, a currier, purchased the land at 38 St. Peter St. and had a one-room-plan house with steep-pitched roof and overhang constructed. After his death in 1732, the house was enlarged. In 1910 the Essex Institute purchased the house, restored it, and moved it to its present location on Brown St. The house is open to visitors and offers a glimpse into life in 17th-century New England. 
The Ward House Great Room
The Ward House Great Room
An interior typical of the room in which Hester Prynne met with the Governor and ministers. 
Great Room in John Ward House
Great Room in John Ward House
This photograph of the Great Room in the John Ward House shows the beams and the low ceiling typical of a seventeenth century house. This is the type of room in which Hester Prynne would have met with the governor and ministers. 
The Great Room of the John Ward House
The Great Room of the John Ward House
This photograph shows the rope bed and diamond-case window in the Great Room of the John Ward House. The windows reflect the lattice pattern described of those in the Governor's hall as described by Hawthorne in The Scarlet Letter 
Swift in the Great Room of the John Ward House
Swift in the Great Room of the John Ward House
This was used to wind yarn from a spinning wheel. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Sideboard with pewterware in Great Room of John Ward House
Sideboard with pewterware in Great Room of John Ward House
These furnishings in the John Ward House are typical of those that would have been found in the Governor's Hall and in the widow's house in which Dimmesdale and Chillingworth lived. 
John Ward House, Brown St. opposite Howard, (originally at 38 St. Peter St.) built after 1684
John Ward House, Brown St. opposite Howard, (originally at 38 St. Peter St.) built after 1684
This is one of the best examples of 17th century wood-frame-and-and clapboard houses in New England. In December 1684 John Ward, a currier, purchased the land at 38 St. Peter St. and had a one-room-plan house with steep-pitched roof and overhang constructed. After his death in 1732, the house was enlarged. In 1910 the Essex Institute purchased the house, restored it, and moved it to its present location on Brown St. The house is open to visitors and offers a glimpse into life in 17th-century New England.  
The Marston House, Salem
The Marston House, Salem
Sidney Perley tells us that "in 1680, Benjamin Marston built a fine large house on the western corner of Essex and Cambridge streets; and, Feb. 24, 1701-2, for two hundred and ninety pounds, conveyed it with the land to James Menzies, who had recently moved from Boston to Salem. Through a mortgage, the estate became the property of Philip English. John Touzell lived in the house in 1754, when he conveyed one-half of it to William Hathorne and wife Mary and widow Susannah Hathorne. It remained in the families of English some time, and, when it belonged to the Hathornes, about 1814, they built the house out to the Essex Street line. The engraving shows the end of the original house and the new front." (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

Daniel Epes House, Salem (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

Eighteenth Century Houses

Crowninshield-Bentley House, 126 Essex St. at Washington Square West, 1727-30
Crowninshield-Bentley House, 126 Essex St. at Washington Square West, 1727-30
Crowninshield-Bentley House Built in 1727-30 for sea captain and fish merchant John Crowninshield, this house was enlarged in 1761 and 1794. In 1959-60, the house was moved to its present location across from the Hawthorne Hotel, and modern additions, which had appeared over the years, were removed to restore the house to its eighteenth century appearance. This house is considered perhaps the finest example of Georgian Colonial architecture in Salem and is currently open to the public and maintained by the Peabody Essex Museum. It is noted for its symmetrical front elevation with reconstructed front and central doorway flanked by flat Doric pilasters. 
House at 27 Herbert Street in Salem where the merchant, Elias Hasket Derby (1739-1799), grew up.
House at 27 Herbert Street in Salem where the merchant, Elias Hasket Derby (1739-1799), grew up.
In the Custom House chapter of The Scarlet Letter Hawthorne refers to E.H. Derby as "King Derby." 
Richard Derby House (Derby-Ward House), 27 Herbert St., coirner of Derby and Herbert Streets, Salem
Richard Derby House (Derby-Ward House), 27 Herbert St., coirner of Derby and Herbert Streets, Salem
Elias H. Derby (1739-1799), a prosperous merchant of the eighteenth century, grew up in this house built in 1738 for his father, Richard, a successful sea captain and ship owner. The Wards purchased this house from the Derbys after the Revolutionary War and occupied the house well into the nineteenth century, but ownership after that is uncertain. In the Custom House chapter of The Scarlet Letter Hawthorne refers to E.H. Derby as "King Derby." (courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum; special thanks to Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.)
Essex Bank Building, 11 Central St., (1811)
Essex Bank Building, 11 Central St., (1811)
 
Joseph Felt House, 113 Federal St.
Joseph Felt House, 113 Federal St.
This three-story early Salem Federal residence was built in 1794/5 for Joseph Felt, housewright and farmer.  (courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum; special thanks to Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.)
Peirce-Nichols House, 80 Federal St., Salem
Peirce-Nichols House, 80 Federal St., Salem
Peirce-Nichols House This elegant house, built c. 1782, is one of the most outstanding examples of Federalist wooden residences in America. The house was first owned by Jerathemiel Peirce, a leather-dresser who became a prosperous merchant and who developed with Aaron Waitt one of the largest India trading companies in the U.S. When Peirce's daughter, Sally, married George Nichols in 1801, the house was remodeled in McIntire's later Adamesque style, but it retains details of his Georgian style as well. The house was transferred to the ownership of George S. Johonnot in 1827, but in 1840 George Nichols inherited the house, and it remained in the Nichols family until 1917 when the Essex Institute purchased it. (courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum; special thanks to Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.)
18 Chestnut Street at corner of Botts Court, Salem
18 Chestnut Street at corner of Botts Court, Salem
Exterior of 18 Chestnut Street (Bott-Fabin house) where Hawthorne lived from 1846-49 while working as surveyor at the Salem Custom House. (photography by Lou Procopio)
18 Chestnut St., Salem, side view
18 Chestnut St., Salem, side view
Side view of 18 Chestnut St., Salem, where Hawthorne lived from 1846-1849 while working as surveyor at the Salem Custom House (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Entry of 18 Chestnut St., Salem
Entry of 18 Chestnut St., Salem
Entry of 18 Chestnut St. in Salem where Hawthorne lived from 1846-49 while working as surveyor at the Salem Custom House (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
View of Bott-Fabin House, 18 Chestnut St. in Salem from Bott's Court
View of Bott-Fabin House, 18 Chestnut St. in Salem from Bott's Court
Hawthorne lived at 18 Chestnut St. from 1846-49 while working as surveyor at the Salem Custom House. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

Bott-Fabens House 

Nineteenth Century Houses

Gardner-Pingree House, 128 Essex St., 1804-5
Gardner-Pingree House, 128 Essex St., 1804-5
Salem merchant John Gardner, Jr., built the house in 1804-5, and in 1811, because of financial difficulties, sold the house to Nathaniel West who sold the house three years later to Joseph White. It is here where Captain Joseph White lived and was murdered in April 1830, an event that shook the town of Salem and one which intrigued Hawthorne and which he wrote about in "Mr. Higginbotham's Catastrophe." In 1834, the house was sold to David Pingree, and the ownership of the house remained in the Pingree family until 1933 when it was donated by the Pingree heirs to the Essex Institute. With its lovely details and proportions, this dwelling is considered to be a superb example of American Adamesque Federal town houses and perhaps the best example in New England. Many scholars believe the house was designed by Samuel McIntire and consider it to be his finest mature work. Details consistent with McIntire's work are the symmetrical rectangular facade wooden roof balustrade and an elaborate semicircular portico entrance with Corinthian columns and pilasters. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Gardner-Pingree House, 128 Essex St., 1804-5, photographed in 2003
Gardner-Pingree House, 128 Essex St., 1804-5, photographed in 2003
Salem merchant John Gardner, Jr., built the house in 1804-5, and in 1811, because of financial difficulties, sold the house to Nathaniel West who sold the house three years later to Joseph White. It is here where Captain Joseph White lived and was murdered in April 1830, an event that shook the town of Salem and one which intrigued Hawthorne and which he wrote about in "Mr. Higginbotham's Catastrophe." In 1834, the house was sold to David Pingree, and the ownership of the house remained in the Pingree family until 1933 when it was donated by the Pingree heirs to the Essex Institute. With its lovely details and proportions, this dwelling is considered to be a superb example of American Adamesque Federal town houses and perhaps the best example in New England. Many scholars believe the house was designed by Samuel McIntire and consider it to be his finest mature work. Details consistent with McIntire's work are the symmetrical rectangular facade wooden roof balustrade and an elaborate semicircular portico entrance with Corinthian columns and pilasters. (photography by Bruce Hibbard)
Joseph Waters House (later the Bertram Home for Aged Men)114 Derby and Turner Sts., Salem
Joseph Waters House (later the Bertram Home for Aged Men)114 Derby and Turner Sts., Salem
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Robinson-Little House, 10 Chestnut St. at Cambridge (c. 1808-9)
Robinson-Little House, 10 Chestnut St. at Cambridge (c. 1808-9)
his brick Federal home with Greek Revival front entrance was built c. 1808-1809 for a Salem merchant, Nathan Robinson. Robinson lived in the house until the mid 1830s, after which the Choates, Neals, and Fabens families occupied the house.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)

Forrester-Peabody House 
John  Tucker Daland house, the east portion of the former Essex Institute
John Tucker Daland house, the east portion of the former Essex Institute
The John Tucker Daland house was built in 1851/2 for a wealthy Salem merchant. Daland and his family lived in the house until 1885 when the Essex Institute purchased the house. When Plummer Hall (erected in 1856-7)was also purchased by the Essex Institute in 1906, the Daland house was attached to it by a Renaissance Revival section. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
\"Doorways of Salem\" from Perley's <I/>The History of Salem, Massachusetts.</I>
"Doorways of Salem" from Perley's The History of Salem, Massachusetts.
This illustration gives examples of Salem's outstanding architectural heritage of Federal style design.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)