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Literature Related to The Wayside

Literature Related to The Wayside

Exterior view of The Wayside
Exterior view of The Wayside
 
  • The Blithedale Romance
    Hawthore published this novel in July, 1852, shortly after moving to the Wayside.

  • The Life of Franklin Pierce
    In August of 1852, soon after moving to The Wayside, Hawthorne completed the biography, The Life of Franklin Pierce. Much of the biography is devoted to sections from Pierce's Mexican War journal.
  • "Septimius Felton" Hawthorne's unfinished work "Septimius Felton" features a character inspired by the man who inherited The Wayside a generation before Hawthorne who believed that he would never die.

  • "Tanglewood Tales"
    Hawthorne began writing "Tanglewood Tales," a recreation of six myths, while living at the Wayside. The work was published in September, 1853, while Hawthorne and his family were living in England.

  • "Chiefly About War Matters By a Peaceable Man"
    Hawthorne published this essay on the Civil War in July, 1862 while living at the Wayside, after a visit with Lincoln in Washington, D.C.

  • "Grimshawe"
    (first titled "The Ancestral Footstep" then "Etherege" and finally "Grimshawe") Hawthorne began to write this story in 1860 or 1861 but put aside the work in late 1861, leaving it unfinished. The tale is set in Salem in the house next to the Charter Street Burying Point. In this autobiographical tale, Ned is the young Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Grimshawe is in some ways Hawthorne in his depressed final years.

  • "Septimius Felton" and "Septiumius Norton"
    Hawthorne began to write this story in 1861 while living at the Wayside. This story is set in 1775 in Concord when the British confronted American farmers at the Concord bridge and focuses on the inner conflicts of a young seminary student, Septimius Felton, who, like Hawthorne himself in his waning years, felt "a vague depression of the spirit."

  • Our Old Home
    In June of 1863, the Atlantic Monthly articles he had written between 1860 and 1863 were published as Our Old Home.

  • "The Dolliver Romance"
    Around December, 1863, or January, 1864, Hawthorne began "The Dolliver Romance" while living at the Wayside. "The Dolliver Romance," like "Grimshawe," is set in the house next to the Charter Street Burying Point in Salem.



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