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Images Related to The Wayside in Concord

Images Related to The Wayside in Concord

The Wayside, Concord, MA
The Wayside, Concord, MA
The Wayside is the only home Nathaniel Hawthorne ever owned. Hawthorne purchased the house from the Alcotts in 1852 and moved in with his wife, Sophia and children Una, Julian and Rose. His family owned the property until July 1870.  (Photography by Joseph R. Modugno)
Postcard of Wayside, Concord, MA
Postcard of Wayside, Concord, MA
Hawthorne moved to this former home of the Alcotts with his family in 1852. This is the only home that Hawthorne ever owned. When Hawthorne received his appointment as consul in Liverpool in 1853, he and his family left the Wayside. After Hawthorne's appointment ended in 1857, he and his family spent time in France and Italy and then returned to The Wayside in 1860. (special thanks to David McClure)
Exterior view of The Wayside
Exterior view of The Wayside
Exterior Wayside (5)- Exterior view of The Wayside, the only home Nathaniel Hawthorne ever owned. Hawthorne purchased the house from the Alcotts in1852 and moved in with his wife, Sophia and children Una, Julian and Rose. He and his family would own the property until July 1870. 
Side view of The Wayside in Concord
Side view of The Wayside in Concord
Side view of The Wayside in Concord, the only house Hawthorne owned. When Hawthorne and Sophia lived here from the winter of 1852 to July of 1853, the house had no porches and a central entrance, and, according to E.H. Miller in Salem Was My Dwelling Place,"the paint was of 'a rusty olive hue'" (378). Hawthorne bought the house from Bronson Alcott for $1,500 and eight acres of land on the other side of the road from Ralph Waldo Emerson for $500 (Miller 378).According to Miller, it was Hawthorne who gave the house the name "The Wayside" (378). 
View of Tower Addition of The Wayside in Concord, MA
View of Tower Addition of The Wayside in Concord, MA
View of Tower Addition (24)- A view from the West of Hawthorne's three-story tower addition. The top story was Hawthorne's Tower Study, the second-story was the "Terrace Bedroom", so called because during the Hawthorne years the windows in this room opened onto the remnants of the 12 terraces that Broson Alcott had carved into the hillside behind the house during the Alcott years 1845-1848. The first floor was the formal parlor during the Hawthorne years. (photography by Dan Popp)
Sign at The Wayside in COncord
Sign at The Wayside in COncord
Sign at The Wayside in Concord (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Plaque Commemorating Larch Path from The Wayside into Concord
Plaque Commemorating Larch Path from The Wayside into Concord
Plaque Commemorating the Larch Path which Hawthorne used to walk from The Wayside into the center of Concord.  (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
The Larch Path
The Larch Path
The Larch Path (23) - one of Hawthorne's favorite haunts. It still leads from The Wayside to Orchard House, the Alcotts' home next door. (courtesy of the National Park Service)
Statue of Hawthorne at his Reading Stand at The Wayside in Concord
Statue of Hawthorne at his Reading Stand at The Wayside in Concord
Statue of Hawthorne at his reading stand at the entrance to The Wayside in Concorc. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Hawthorne's attic study, The Wayside, Concord, MA
Hawthorne's attic study, The Wayside, Concord, MA
Hawthorne's attic study in The Wayside, one of the houses where he and Sophia lived from the winter of 1852 to July of 1853 in Concord. In 1853 they moved to Liverpool, England, where Hawthorne served as the American consul in Liverpool.The Wayside was the only house Hawthorne owned.  (photography by Dan Popp)
Hawthorne's Stand-up Desk in His Attic Study, The Wayside, Concord, MA
Hawthorne's Stand-up Desk in His Attic Study, The Wayside, Concord, MA
Hawthorne's stand-up desk in his attic study at The Wayside in Concord,where he and Sophia lived from the winter of 1852 to July of 1853 when they moved to Liverpool. While living in The Wayside, Hawthorne wrote The Life of Franklin Pierce, and he completed Tanglewood Tales.  
Stand-up Writing Desk
Stand-up Writing Desk
Stand-up Writing Desk (22) - Hawthorne's stand-up writing desk in his Tower Study. Hawthorne deliberately had his desk facing the book shelves that were part of the desk, so he would would not be distracted by the wonderful view from the south-facing window. 
N. Mural with Busts
N. Mural with Busts
N. Mural with Busts (14)- This is one of three beautiful murals that grace the vaulted ceiling of Hawthorne's Tower Study. The scenes in these murals are one artist's, George Arthur Gray, tribute to another artist, Nathaniel Hawthorne. These murals were painted in 1871 when the Grays owned the house. The two early 20th century busts that sit atop Hawthorne's book closets were made by P. P. Capproni Brothers of Boston. The bust on the right is possibly Antonia(A. D. 38) daughter of Mark Anthony and Octavia and mother of the Emperor Claudius. It has also been identified as "Clytie", a nymph turned into a flower for her unrequited love of Appolo. The other bust is of Plato. 
Bookcloset with Plato
Bookcloset with Plato
Bookcloset with Plato (2) - This view shows one of Hawthorne's book closets in his Tower Study. Hawthorne's son, Julian, inscribed quotes over the doors of his father's book closets. Above the door of this closet, Julian wrote "All care abandon ye who enter here." a paraphrase of "All Hope abandon ye who enter here." from Dante's "The Inferno". 
Manuscript Closet
Manuscript Closet
Manuscript Closet (12) - Hawthorne's manuscript closet at the foot of the stairs to his Tower Study where Hawthorne kept his writing materials. It is said that when word of Hawthorne's death reached his family, Rose was in her father's Tower Study, and as she descended she opened the door to her father's manuscript closet and on one of the shelves was the unfinished Dolliver Romance . 
Sitting Room in the Wayside
Sitting Room in the Wayside
During the Hawthorne years this was the dining room for the family, as it was during the Alcott years. The fireplace screen was decorated by Rose Hawthorne for Harriett Lothrop. She inscribed a verse from her father's short story, "Fire Worship" in Mosses From an Old Manse: "Beautiful it is to see the strengthening gleam-the deepening light-that gradually casts distinct shadows of the human figure, the table, and the high-backed chairs, upon the opposite wall, and at length, as twilight comes on, replenishes the room with living radiance, and makes life all rose-color." (photography by Rich Murphy)
Hawthorne Table in the Wayside Sitting Room, described in the introductory to Hawthorne's <i>Tanglewood Tales</i>
Hawthorne Table in the Wayside Sitting Room, described in the introductory to Hawthorne's Tanglewood Tales
Hawthorne Table (9)- During the Hawthorne years at The Wayside this room served several functions. From 1852-1853 this room was the Sitting Room for the Hawthorne's. There is a wonderful description of this room in the introductory to Hawthorne's Tanglewood Tales. The dining room table belonged to Nathaniel and Sophia Hawthorne and was sold by their daughter, Rose and her husband, George Parsons Lathrop. The table was sold by the Lathrops in 1883, along with the house, to Harriett and Daniel Lothrop.  (courtesy of the National Park Service)
Hawthorne Secretary
Hawthorne Secretary
Hawthorne Secretary (18)- This is the "Bay Window Room" which Hawthorne had constructed in August 1860. Sophia Hawthorne called it her chapel because she gave Sunday School lessons to her children here. The secretary belonged to Sophia. 
Shaving Stand 2
Shaving Stand 2
Shaving Stand 2 (19) - "The West Chamber" was the Master Bedroom of Nathaniel and Sophia Hawthorne as it was for the Alcotts. You can see Hawthorne's shaving stand and the "Butler's Secretary" next to it belonged to Rose Hawthorne and her husband, George Parsons Lathrop. 


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