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Images Related to Museums, Libraries, and Schools in Salem

East India Marine Hall, part of the Peabody Essex Museum, 161 Essex St. Mall, Salem
East India Marine Hall, part of the Peabody Essex Museum, 161 Essex St. Mall, Salem
East India Marine Hall was built in 1824/5 for the East India Marine Society, which was established in 1799. In his book Architecture in Salem, Bryant F. Tolles, Jr. explains that the building was for some time thought to have been the design of Alexander Parris (1780-1849) but that it is now believed to be the work of masterbuilder Thomas Waldron Sumner (1768-1849), an associate of Alexander Parris (75-76). Tolles describes the building as "[a]late Federal-style edifice presaging the Greek Revival" and says thet "it possesses seven byas on its front granite gable end, with rectangular windows on the first floor and a string of tall arched windows on the second" (76). He points out that "[i]n the closed pediment gable above is an unusual round window with a square surround punctuated by radiating keystones" (76). According to Tolles, "[a]dditions to this first structure have failed to compromise its original appearance"(76). The addition in 1974/5 is "a granite-faced structure of the contemporary (Brutalist) school of architecture that is notable for its massiveness, rectilinearity, and broad, quiet wall surfaces, interrupted by deep-shadowed penetrations and plate-glass window apertures"(Tolles, 76). (courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum; special thanks to Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.)
Entrance to the new Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA, opened to the public in June, 2003
Entrance to the new Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA, opened to the public in June, 2003
 (photography by Bruce Hibbard)
View of entrance to new Peabody Essex Museum, opened to the public in June, 2003
View of entrance to new Peabody Essex Museum, opened to the public in June, 2003
 (photography by Bruce Hibbard)
Rear of the New Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA
Rear of the New Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA
The new museum opened to the public in June, 2003. (photography by Bruce Hibbard)
New Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA, opened to the public in June, 2003
New Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA, opened to the public in June, 2003
 (photography by Bruce Hibbard)
 John Tucker Daland House (purchased by the Essex Institute in 1885 and linked to Plummer Hall after the Essex Institute acquired that building in 1906); the house is now part of the Peabody Essex Museum
John Tucker Daland House (purchased by the Essex Institute in 1885 and linked to Plummer Hall after the Essex Institute acquired that building in 1906); the house is now part of the Peabody Essex Museum
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
The John Tucker Daland House, formerly the Essex Institute (in Hawthorne's time known as the Essex Historical Society) is now part of the Peabody Essex Museum.
The John Tucker Daland House, formerly the Essex Institute (in Hawthorne's time known as the Essex Historical Society) is now part of the Peabody Essex Museum.
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
John  Tucker Daland house, the east portion of the former Essex Institute
John Tucker Daland house, the east portion of the former Essex Institute
The John Tucker Daland house was built in 1851/2 for a wealthy Salem merchant. Daland and his family lived in the house until 1885 when the Essex Institute purchased the house. When Plummer Hall (erected in 1856-7)was also purchased by the Essex Institute in 1906, the Daland house was attached to it by a Renaissance Revival section. (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
The John Tucker Daland house, the east portion of the former Essex Institute
The John Tucker Daland house, the east portion of the former Essex Institute
The John Tucker Daland house was built in 1851/2 for a wealthy Salem merchant. Daland and his family lived in the house until 1885 when the Essex Institute purchased the house. When Plummer Hall (erected in 1856-7)was also purchased by the Essex Institute in 1906, the Daland house was attached to it by a Renaissance Revival section. (photography by Bruce Hibbard)
Salem Public Library and Bertram Elm Tree
Salem Public Library and Bertram Elm Tree
Postcard from 1919 of the Salem Public Library and a Bertram elm tree 
Salem Public Library
370 Essex St.
Salem Public Library 370 Essex St.
 (courtesy of Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA)
Salem Witch Museum (built for East Church in 1844-46; home of the Witch Museum since 1972), 19 ½ Washington Square North at Brown St. (built in 1844-46)
Salem Witch Museum (built for East Church in 1844-46; home of the Witch Museum since 1972), 19 ½ Washington Square North at Brown St. (built in 1844-46)
The East Church, organized in 1718, was the oldest branch of the First Church of Salem. Hawthorne’s Manning grandparents attended East Church, a liberal Unitarian congregation led by Dr. William Bentley from 1783-1819. Hawthorne’s mother, Elizabeth Clarke Manning, also attended East Church as a young girl when Dr. Bentley was pastor. She joined First Church in 1806, however, and had her children baptized there. According to Gilbert L. Streeter in “Salem Before the Revolution,” EIHC, 32 (1896), the East Church meeting-house was located near the corner of Essex and Hardy streets (87). The building was demolished in 1845, however, and a new church was built at 19 ½ Washington Square North at Brown St between 1844 and 1846. This Gothic Revival building today houses the Salem Witch Museum. (courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum; special thanks to Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.)
Salem Witch Museum, 19 1/2 Washington Square North at Brown Street (formerly East Church; built in 1844-46)
Salem Witch Museum, 19 1/2 Washington Square North at Brown Street (formerly East Church; built in 1844-46)
This building has been the home of the Salem Witch Museum since 1972. (photography by Lou Procopio)
Corner of Front and Washington St. where the Salem Athenaeum was located in the 1840s
Corner of Front and Washington St. where the Salem Athenaeum was located in the 1840s
The Salem Athenaeum began as part of the Social Library on Market Street, now known as Central Street, in Salem. It opened on July 11, 1810, but moved three times to various sites in Salem over the next forty years, including this site at the corner of Front and Washington St. In 1845, however, a bequest from Caroline Plummer enabled the Athenaeum to erect a building, the original Plummer Hall, at 134 Essex Street. The Athenaeum shared this building with the Essex Institute until 1905, when Plummer Hall was sold to the Essex Institute (now the Peabody Essex Museum), and with the proceeds constructed the building it currently occupies at 337 Essex St. (courtesy of David Gavenda, NPS)
Salem Athenaeum, 337 Essex St. in Salem, in 2000
In
Salem Athenaeum, 337 Essex St. in Salem, in 2000 In
The Salem Athenaeum began as part of the Social Library on Market Street, now known as Central Street, in Salem. It opened on July 11, 1810, but moved three times to various sites in Salem over the next forty years. In 1845, however, a bequest from Caroline Plummer enabled the Athenaeum to erect a building, the original Plummer Hall, at 134 Essex Street. The Athenaeum shared this building with the Essex Institute until 1905, when Plummer Hall was sold to the Essex Institute (now the Peabody Essex Museum), and with the proceeds constructed the building it currently occupies at 337 Essex St.

By 1837 the Salem Athenaeum housed 8,000 volumes. According to Hawthorne scholar Margaret Moore in her book The Salem World of Nathaniel Hawthorne, it was the "pooled holdings of the Philosophical and Social Libraries, which merged in 1810," six years after Hawthorne's birth (158). The Athenaeum supplied Hawthorne with a tremendous amount of reading material during his Salem years.

William Manning (1779-1864), Hawthorne's maternal uncle, owned a share in the Salem Athenaeum from 1820-1827. Mary Manning (1777-1841) also was a member from 1826; she later gave this share to Hawthorne. Today this same share is owned by David Gavenda of the National Park Service. (photography by Terri Whitney)

Salem Athenaeum, 337 Essex St. in Salem; photo from <I>Architecture in Salem</I> by Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.
Salem Athenaeum, 337 Essex St. in Salem; photo from Architecture in Salem by Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.
The Salem Athenaeum began as part of the Social Library on Market Street, now known as Central Street, in Salem. It opened on July 11, 1810, but moved three times to various sites in Salem over the next forty years. In 1845, however, a bequest from Caroline Plummer enabled the Athenaeum to erect a building, the original Plummer Hall, at 134 Essex Street. The Athenaeum shared this building with the Essex Institute until 1905, when Plummer Hall was sold to the Essex Institute (now the Peabody Essex Museum), and with the proceeds constructed the building it currently occupies at 337 Essex St.

By 1837 the Salem Athenaeum housed 8,000 volumes. According to Hawthorne scholar Margaret Moore in her book The Salem World of Nathaniel Hawthorne, it was the "pooled holdings of the Philosophical and Social Libraries, which merged in 1810," six years after Hawthorne's birth (158). The Athenaeum supplied Hawthorne with a tremendous amount of reading material during his Salem years.

William Manning (1779-1864), Hawthorne's maternal uncle, owned a share in the Salem Athenaeum from 1820-1827. Mary Manning (1777-1841) also was a member from 1826; she later gave this share to Hawthorne. Today this same share is owned by David Gavenda of the National Park Service. (courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum; special thanks to Bryant F. Tolles, Jr.)

The State Normal School in Salem, built in 1893-1896
The State Normal School in Salem, built in 1893-1896
Postcard c. 1900 of the State Normal School in Salem, MA. A State Normal school was located in Salem since 1854. Until 1896 it occupied the brick building at the corner of Summer and Broad Streets. The new building, erected in 1893-1896, is at the junction of Lafayette St. and Loring Ave. It coversa ground area of 11.000 square feet. The architect was J. Philip Rinn of Boston, and the cost was $200,000. 
Salem State College, Lafayette St. and Loring
Salem State College, Lafayette St. and Loring
 (photography by Lou Procopio)


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